Zippy Chippy. Image by Bruce Schreiner / Associated Press.

Zippy the winless racehorse enjoys a winning role at last

Zippy Chippy.  Image by Bruce Schreiner / Associated Press.
Zippy Chippy shares a paddock with Red Down South at Old Friends farm near Georgetown, Ky. Image by Bruce Schreiner / Associated Press.

The story of Zippy Chippy has been making its way around and we figured you have most likely seen it. But what if you have not? This is a remarkable story not to be missed.

Would you believe that a 21-year old Thoroughbred racehorse who never won one of his 100 starts is now an ambassador for other off-the-track Thoroughbreds?

Well, it’s true! And his name is Zippy Chippy. Read introduction below or go straight to the New York Times article.

Cross-posted from the New York Times

GEORGETOWN, Ky. (AP) — A horse that never posed in the winner’s circle is living the good life this summer on a scenic Kentucky farm, and his losses could mean a big win for retired thoroughbreds.

Zippy Chippy belied his name during a remarkable winless streak, failing to win even one of his 100 starts during a career at tracks in the Northeast. His futility earned him a spot on People magazine’s list of the most interesting personalities.

Now, Zippy, the 21-year-old dark brown gelding who last raced in 2004, has emerged from the pack as a lovable ambassador for the humane treatment of horses no longer able to bring in money from racing or breeding to pay their feed and veterinarian bills. Continue reading at NYTimes.com >>

3 thoughts on “Zippy the winless racehorse enjoys a winning role at last”

  1. What a doll! That he survived means he has been a winner all of his life. He made it to safety, finally.

    Interesting that we see so many young horses break down and die quickly after beginning their racing careers now. This horse is 21 and apparently sound? Gives a clue as to what has happened in breeding/racing. I would guess his trainer took care of him properly and knew enough to invest in this horse. If so, that sure paid off.

    I knew a TB who always came in 2nd. He won once when he got angry at another horse who bumped him early in a race. That’s what it took for that cutie to finish ahead of everybody else. He always paid his bills at the track so his owners got by Ok. He gave them income and excitement for years and in return, he is retired with the same family.

    He is 27 or 28 now and has had a lifelong interest in being a practical joker. He is an expert at that. He likes other horses and makes friends easily. This OTTB is so intelligent that he could do anything.

    Many horses are simply not interested in competition and bored with running in a circle all the time. Engaging in basic ground training during the period of time they are stuck at a track helps with the boredom, discourages bad habit from developing and helps promote successful adoptions later on.

    TB’s, like all horses, are incredibly intelligent and have tons of untapped potential for any discipline.

    Like

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