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APHIS to use iris scanners to identify sored horses

JILL BARNES NELSON reporting for the Tehachapi News writes:

” . . .companies are working on an eye scan for identifying horses — just like in the spy movies.

“The scanners will use an infrared light that can capture an image of a horse’s iris from distances of up to a yard away. The iris image would be matched to information stored in a central database and could be used to identify stolen animals. It also could be used to identify a horse before a race. It should give an accurate reading, as no two irises are the same.

“The Animal & Plant Health Inspection Service began using the technology in 2013. It allows inspectors to better identify horses before they enter inspection areas. APHIS will use iris scanners as part of the agency’s continued efforts to put an end to horse soring through its enforcement of the Horse Protection Act. Soring is the use of chemicals or pressure to cause pain when the foot touches the ground, resulting in the horse picking up its feet higher and faster than it would do naturally.

“The Horse Protection Act is a federal law that prohibits sored horses from participating in shows, sales, exhibitions or auctions.”

At the beginning of the article there is a nice summary of how horses use their eyes. Read it all here »

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RELATED READING
http://horsefund.org/horse-soring-fact-sheet.php
http://horsefund.org/horse-soring-faq.php

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