Stephanie Nagler, right, helps evacuate horses from the Sullivan Canyon Equestrian Community in Brentwood on Tuesday.(Mel Melcon / Los Angeles Times)

California “Easy Fire” horses and emergency preparation tips

Not All Heroes Wear Capes

A touching video captures the moment a brave horse galloped back into a roadside area overcome by thick smoke — despite rescuers’ attempts to corral him — to bring two other horses to safety as the Easy Fire raged in Ventura County.

“From the #EasyFire in Simi Valley — this thoroughbred goes back into the blaze to get his family,” Rex Chapman posted to Twitter Thursday. “Not all heroes wear capes . . .”

Dorany Pineda of the The LA Times reported:

The Easy fire, which broke out shortly after 6 a.m. near Easy Street and Madera Road, has forced thousands of people from their homes as officials try to keep flames from overtaking neighborhoods.

Volunteers help evacuate horses during the Easy Fire, Wednesday, Oct. 30, 2019, in Simi Valley, Calif. (Christian Monterrosa/AP)
Volunteers help evacuate horses during the Easy Fire, Wednesday, Oct. 30, 2019, in Simi Valley, Calif. (Christian Monterrosa/AP)

The equestrian community has consistently come together during fires. Volunteers often find people who need help through word-of-mouth or on social media, especially through a Facebook group called Southern California Equine Emergency Evacuation.

Cheryl Kanan evacuates with her horse Aries as the Easy fire approaches Wednesday, Oct. 30, 2019, in Simi Valley, Calif. A new wildfire erupted Wednesday in wind-whipped Southern California, forcing the evacuation of the Ronald Reagan Presidential Library and nearby homes, as both ends of the state struggled with blazes, dangerously gusty weather and deliberate blackouts. (AP Photo/Marcio Jose Sanchez)
Cheryl Kanan evacuates with her horse Aries as the Easy fire approaches Wednesday, Oct. 30, 2019, in Simi Valley, Calif. A new wildfire erupted Wednesday in wind-whipped Southern California, forcing the evacuation of the Ronald Reagan Presidential Library and nearby homes, as both ends of the state struggled with blazes, dangerously gusty weather and deliberate blackouts. (AP Photo/Marcio Jose Sanchez)

Ms Pineda posted these superb tips to get and keep you prepared in case of an emergency regarding pets and large animals such as horses. Thank you Ms Pineda and the LA Times.

Preparing Pets for Emergencies

Before an emergency strikes:

  • Microchip your pets and make sure they have proper and up-to-date identification. If you’re separated from your animals, a microchip will increase your chances of reuniting with them.
  • Include phone numbers of out-of-area friends or family in your microchip registration. It’s a good idea to include alternate contacts in case you can’t be reached.Locate pet-friendly lodgings.
  • Contact hotels and motels in and outside of your city and ask if they accept pets during emergencies.
  • Do the same for boarding facilities. Know where they are and visit them.
  • Get your pet used to being in a kennel. It’ll make it easier to transport them.
  • Paste a rescue alert sticker visibly on one of your home’s windows with the number and species of animals in your household. (If you evacuate with your pets, write “Evacuated” on the sticker.)

Preparing Large Animals for Emergencies

  • Microchip the animal or wrap an identification bracelet around one of his feet.
  • Train your horse or other large animal to load into a trailer.
  • If possible, make prior arrangements for boarding at stables outside of your city.
  • Store important documents and paperwork in cloud storage or several hard drives. It’s a good idea to give one to a friend or family who lives outside of your community.

Make a Large Animal Evacuation Kit

Include the following:

FOOD

  • Drums or barrels of water, enough for at least three days.
  • A list of all medicines and their doses and if possible, an extra supply of medication. Make sure to check their expiration dates regularly.
  • Rope and leather halters. Don’t use nylon halters. They can melt from extreme heat and burn the animal.

IMPORTANT DOCUMENTS AND PAPERWORK

  • Copies of ownership records
  • Vaccination and health records
  • Microchip paperwork

IDENTIFICATION

  • Photos of brands
  • Photos of your large animal that show any distinctive marks or tattoos

It is never recommended that you leave your large animal behind or let him loose during an emergency. The Department of Animal Services offers assistance for large animal transportation.

If you have a horse and absolutely can’t evacuate with him and have to set him loose, the National Fire Protection Assn. suggests you make sure to mark or attach your contact information on him by:

  • Shaving it into his coat
  • Braiding an identification tag into his mane
    Attaching it onto a neck band
  • Writing it on his side with spray paint or a livestock marker

Be sure to have an evacuation kit ready.

4 thoughts on “California “Easy Fire” horses and emergency preparation tips”

  1. It was incredible to see that horse go back to the mare and foal to show them the way, he sure had them foremost in his mind, such love and loyalty.
    The wildfires have been constantly in the news here in Australia and I especially worry about the horses. You can put a cat or a dog in your car with you but the horses often seek to flee from fire, they really feel the fear. Thoughts and prayers for all of you.

    Liked by 1 person

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