Old South Carriage Company. Post and Courier image.

Charleston Carriage Horse Advocates call for new regulations after needless death of carriage horse Ervin

CHARLESTON, S.C., July 22, 2020 /PRNewswire/ — On Sunday evening as neighbors gathered on sidewalks and on the streets of a local Charleston neighborhood, Ervin the beautiful draft horse careened down Anson and Laurens Streets pulling what appeared to be a half-hitched carriage wagon according to videos taken at the scene.  

The photo shows a bleeding Ervin who suffered a severe injury to his leg and was later euthanized by a veterinarian. Charleston Carriage Horse Advocates mourn the needless death of Ervin.  

Ervin
Ervin

As citizens and taxpayers, we can no longer look away and are calling upon Charleston elected officials to take a hard look at protocols and lax regulations regarding the working and living conditions of carriage animals and proceed with a peer-reviewed independent study immediately.

Public Safety must be addressed by City Council. In the last two and a half (2 ½) years alone, there have been eight (8) runaway wagons and one incident of horses loose on the streets. In heavily congested downtown neighborhoods and with ever-increasing tourist traffic, the threat of public safety becomes urgent.

About Charleston Carriage Horse Advocates

The Charleston Carriage Horse Advocates is an animal welfare based organization established to address the treatment of carriage horses and mules in Charleston, SC.

We are calling on you to support our call for a peer-reviewed, science-based study of Charleston’s horse-drawn carriage industry and legislation that provides for humane working conditions for Charleston’s carriage horses and mules.

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/ccha.join/
Twitter: https://twitter.com/CCHA_JOIN 

Contact:
Audrey Coates
828-764-3038
243926@email4pr.com

SOURCE Charleston Carriage Horse Advocates


Featured Image: Old South Carriage Company. Post and Courier image. Internet search result. Not filed with this Release.

We say . . .

The carriage horse business needs to be shut down. This trade so called has had decades to improve the lives of the horses it uses and subsequently dump when they are of no further use — the ones who survive that is.

Does this look like a well taken care of horse to you?

Old South Carriage Company horse stands in front of fan. The horse is clearly underweight. Post and Courier image.
Old South Carriage Company horse stands hooked up in front of fan. The horse is clearly underweight. Post and Courier image.

Why must we, the compassionate, be told constantly that we must get help for these horses and get regulations in place to better protect them . . . . from the ones who employ them?

Very few retired carriage horses who survive the industry have any sort of life afterwards. Retirement status typically means the horse is worn out with nothing left to give. When the few lucky horses escape their harsh lives, they typically have been rescued by a shelter, sanctuary or private citizen, costing the horses’ former employers who chewed them up and spit them out: nothing.

In the meantime, in the case of Ervin’s death no charges were filed. The Post and Courier reports:

“Because the city ordinance does not include language for proper horse carriage removals, the employees involved in Sunday night’s incident will not be charged, Livability Director Daniel Riccio said Tuesday.” Whatever that means.


Fund for Horses Logo

Updated 6:30 pm EST.

1 thought on “Charleston Carriage Horse Advocates call for new regulations after needless death of carriage horse Ervin”

  1. ☻☻..
    ..the evil that men do..
    ☻☻
    ..gawd how my heart bleeds for these equine treasures..
    ☻☻
    this is cruelty beyond words..
    ..for the sake of gold.
    ☻☻

    Liked by 1 person

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