The difference between veganism and a plant-based diet

ADVOCATE FROM YOUR PLATE — Our Meat Out for Mustangs campaign has yielded a lot of interesting questions. One of the most common is what’s the difference between veganism and a plant-based diet.

In a nutshell, the difference between a plant-based diet and veganism as I understand it can be found in the title.

A plant-based diet is just that. No animals products in your diet. It is a dietary choice.

Vegans eliminate the use of all animals products from their lives including their diets. It is a lifestyle choice. It also involves activism.

This is how I have come to see it. However, I decided to look it up and see that it extends further.

Chloe at eatbychloe.com introduced me to additional philosophical concepts regarding the two.

Under the paragraph entitled “What’s the big f*#@! difference?” she writes:

Veganism is a philosophy deeply devoted to animal rights, and being a vegan (n.) is a lifestyle choice that involves diets, politics and ethics. Vegans (n.) not only eliminate animal products from their diet, but from all aspects of their lives. We’re talking – no leather, fur, wool or silk; products derived from insects (i.e. honey and beeswax); or toiletries that may be derived from and/or tested on animals.

When it comes to food, “plant-based” simply refers to whole, plant foods and NOT just foods considered to be “vegan”. For example, French fries or Oreos are in essence vegan, but are not considered to be “plant-based”, as neither product resembles that of their original plant form.

On the flip side, a “plant-based” meal may by definition be vegan, but a person who follows a plant-based diet is not necessarily a vegan (n.) – whereas they may consume only plant-based products but wear/use products that are derived from animals.

According to a wide variety of sources Veganism is the #1 trend of 2017 and we are very happy about that because it means a safer more peaceful world. It restores and preserves lives and the planet we all inhabit.

Save the Horses. Advocate From Your Plate. Google free image.
Save the Horses. Advocate From Your Plate. Google free image.

The Horse Fund and its blog Tuesday’s Horse are vegan.

How does adopting a vegan lifestyle help horses? A good example of that is not using medicines made from the urine of pregnant mares such as Premarin® cream and tablets. Please see also Advocate From Your Plate™.

Some vegans are quite radical. It takes us all to make a Vegan Nation. If they make you nervous, that’s okay.

Simply search out and experiment with vegan and plant-based recipes from the vast array available on the worldwide web. They are innovative, fun, non-judgmental and will titillate the taste buds of everyone.

Some of the most successful and highly trafficked recipe sites on the internet are run by vegans. So are their cookbooks. Some of them have even become celebrities. Heavenly.

We also highly recommend you follow One Green Planet. It is a fantastic resource for all sorts of vegan lifestyle information. How about this for example. What you should plant to attract bees to your vegetable garden. And 3 Insect-Repelling Perennial Plants for Your Garden or Patio.

Thank you for advocating from your plate — whether its once a day or for a lifetime — and being a part of the Tuesday’s Horse and Horse Fund family.

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FEATURED IMAGE
Close up of a horse munching hay. Unattributed Google search result.

Formula for making a perfect veggie burger without a recipe and grillable recipes too

MEMORIAL DAY — Annie McGee, writing for One Green Planet, has had her shares of ups and downs making veggie burgers over the years and so have we. There are many tried and true recipes but McGee takes that extra step for us.

McGee has a formula for making a perfect veggie burger. Here it is!

Photo: Annie McGee.
Photo: Annie McGee.

Formula for Making Perfect Veggie Burger

(1) The Base. Start your base with a good plant-based protein or a steady starch.

(2) Add Veggies. Add low-moisture veggies first. Carrots, sweet potatoes, butternut squash, root veggies, beets, and so forth, roughly chopped.

(3) Add a Binder. About a 1/2 cup to 1 cup of oats, bread crumbs, prepared quinoa, leftover rice, etc. Alternately, you can use a few tablespoons of binders like flax meal, chia seeds, or hemp hearts.

(4) Kick Up the Flavor. Add some nutritional yeast, garlic, seasoned salt, pepper, freshly picked herbs, or whatever strikes your fancy. The flavors and flavor pairings are pretty much endless.  Tip: For a fresh-0ff-the-grill BBQ taste, add some tomato paste, apple cider vinegar, molasses, and liquid smoke.

(5) Add Final Textures. These are items that should be mixed in by hand, and not processed. Some of the things are too wet and might ruin the texture, some have flavor notes that would overpower the rest of the burger. Examples are apple chunks, jalapeños, blueberries, pineapple chunks, roughly chopped onion, and bell peppers.

(6) Shape and Bake. Preheat your oven to 450°F. Form the batter into patties — you should have anywhere between 8-10 — and place them on a parchment-lined baking sheet. Bake for 15-18 minutes, flip, and bake for about 4-6 additional minutes.

Are you thinking, yeah, but what about the fun of being outside waiting for food fresh off the grill with that outdoor flavor?

Grill vegetables such as potatoes, sweet corn, yams or mushrooms and onions. Wrap them in foil and away you go.

Still not completely doing it for you? Get some totally terrific ideas from these links.

Grillable Veggie Burgers (and Vegan where noted)

10 Epic Veggie Burgers to Throw on the Grill | One Green Planet »

The Quinoa and White Bean Burger (Vegan) is my personal favorite, and our Featured Image up top. So very delicious. I also adore the Red Lentil Burgers with Kale Pesto (Vegan).

I love black beans as a base and I promise this veggie will hold together on the grill.

Grillable Veggie Burger | Minimalist Baker »

Grillable Veggie Burgers. Minimalist Baker.
Grillable Veggie Burgers. Minimalist Baker.

Here’s another!

Kate’s Grillable Black Bean Burgers (Vegan) »

These are super easy to make. You will probably have most of the ingredients on hand too. This recipe is featured on VegWeb.com and comes from Kate’s blog Vegan Ventures.

Hope you try at least one of these tasty burgers. Let us know what you think. Bye for now!

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Quinoa and White Bean Burger (Vegan); One Green Planet.

Chill more than menopausal symptoms with delightful Rhubarb Granitas

In our mission to help horses and foals used and cast off by the pregnant mare’s urine industry that make drugs like Premarin cream and tablets, we urge women to shun them and the cruelty that goes with them, and find an alternative to ease menopausal symptoms.

I went on a rhubarb recipe spree when I learned in an article by Jane Allin that properties of the rhubarb plant do just that — ease menopausal symptoms.

So, how about a icy cool rhubarb granita? A granita, just in case you don’t know, is an Italian-style flavored drink featuring crushed ice.

I found the recipe below at One Green Planet and couldn’t resist sharing it with you. It’s vegan. Naturally.

Oh, and never, ever eat the leaves of a rhubarb plant. Chop rhubarb leaves off straight away and get rid of them.

Rhubarb Granitas

by Lilia Jankowska

Ingredients

1 large bunch of rhubarb
1-2 lemons, juiced and zested
Hibiscus flower petals
Coconut sugar, to taste
2 cups of water

Preparation

  1. Boil water in a pot. Peel the rhubarb, cut it into pieces, and add it to the water.
  2. Add the zest and lemon juice and a few hibiscus petals. Add the birch sugar to taste. Remove from heat and let cool.
  3. Strain the sauce through a fine sieve, squeezing all the juice through, and remove the pulp.
    Pour the rhubarb syrup into a bag and freeze it.
  4. Once frozen break the juice into pieces place these into a blender and mix it until you have the consistency of frozen snow.
  5. Place this into a container and store it in the freezer.

Related Reading

• More on Tuesday’s Horse »
• Learn more about PMU horses at Premstoppers »
• Alternatives to PMU drugs »

 

A Mustang murder mystery in northern Nevada

WILD HORSES NEVADA (Warning: Graphic Image) — On May 10, 2017, Tuesday’s Horse received an email from the Professor and Chair of the Geological and Environmental Sciences Department of a California University stating he was leading a student field trip in Northumberland Canyon south of Austin, Nevada the previous weekend and they discovered the following:

We came across six horse carcasses, all missing their heads. This was very disturbing to the students and I am trying to figure out what happened. Was there planned culling of wild horses? Why would the heads be removed?

The headless remains of a Mustang found in northern Nevada taken by a student while on a geological field trip in the Austin area. May 2017.
The headless remains of a Mustang found in northern Nevada taken by a student while on a geological field trip in the Austin area. May 2017.

The Professor had not been able to reach the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) so reached out to us for assistance.

At long last I tracked down the right BLM office thanks to the coordinates the Professor provided.

After several email exchanges and a few phone calls with a BLM agent in that office, we made little progress figuring out what had happened to these Mustangs or why.

Here is a summary of those exchanges:

• It is highly likely these Mustangs were shot and killed. Although rare in the area, other wild horses have been shot and killed and left on the side of the road in much the same manner.

• The heads were either removed by trophy hunters or for use in local rituals. It is also possible someone discovered the carcasses and removed the skulls much later and cleaned them to use as relics. The heads are not missing because of scavengers.

• Due to the vastness and remoteness of the area it is close to impossible to find any witnesses. Investigators often have to rely on hearsay such as “someone bragging” about the kill.

My BLM contact agreed to talk with other field agents plus get in touch with the U.S. Forestry Service for their input.

A few days later my BLM contact reconnected to tell me that wild horses killed in suspicious circumstances do fall under the jurisdiction of the U.S. Forestry Service and they would determine whether or not to investigate.

An agent of the U.S. Forestry Service contacted me with the following:

• They had discovered carcasses like these the previous year, perhaps even as early as Spring 2016, and they were “probably the same ones”.

• Due to the condition of the carcasses and the amount of time elapsed they have little to nothing to go on and did not feel it warranted the time and expense of an investigation. No one offered an explanation why they took no action at the time they first found the dead horses other than “it’s too hard”.

• They have come across dead Mustangs before where they suspected foul play and occasionally seen heads removed like this.

• The missing heads were not the result of scavenging.

It was never quite clear to me when coming across something like this, how they determine when it is worth investigating and when it is not.

The BLM and USFS were not the only ones. I also contacted a noted investigative reporter who also declined.

So Now What?

The agents I dealt with were responsive. Perhaps it ended the way it did with me at the direction of higher ups.

Yet wait a minute. Any way you look at it, murdering a Mustang is a federal crime. Murdering six. Leaving the six dead horses at the side of the same road. Removing their heads. Surely that warrants at least some looking into.

Something must be done or these murders, even if only committed sporadically, will continue.

I offered a reward for the arrest and conviction of these Mustang Murderers. The response?

I appreciate knowing about the reward and I will see how that might be promoted.

End of story? I thought so until a few minutes ago. We’ll let you know. Stay tuned.