Russell Crowe tweets about horse friends he made on set

Russell Crowe in Gladiator aboard a horse he became friends with.
Russell Crowe in Gladiator aboard a horse he became friends with.

Russell Crowe and horses on set. How tweet it is. Look!

THE DAILY DOT (DailyDot.com) — The Daily Dot reports that Russell Crowe loves horses. We knew that. But particularly horses he makes friends with on set.

Check out this tweet. He mentions a couple of them.

In a Tuesday morning tweet, Crowe recalled that George, the horse upon which he gave his iconic Gladiator speech in the woods before battle, was also on the set of Robin Hood years later. “We would have a chat everyday [sic],” Crowe wrote.

You can see this tweet was a big hit. Thank you Daily Dot. See their story here »

Can Horses Act?

Can horses act? Cutting to the chase, no not in the way humans do or even other mammals.

Example: If you want a horse to look and act scared, you need to scare him. This is the bottom line from all the horse handlers we have talked with over the years who train and take part in movies and stage productions with horses.

Back in 2004, Kelly Chase wrote a insightful article on this subject. We have it on our “new” website. It’s a good read.

Can you believe how old we are? On October 23, we will be embarking on our 16th year defending and protecting horses.

Speed Miller shares the peace he’s found in horses with Detroit’s children

METRO TIMES (Detroit, Oct 3, 2018) — Excerpts from original article by Michael Jackman below. Read full article at the Metro Times here »

Speed Miller and his 21 year old Tennessee Walking Horse, Frisk. NOAH ELLIOT MORRISON.
Speed Miller and his 21 year old Tennessee Walking Horse, Frisk. NOAH ELLIOT MORRISON.

FOR YEARS NOW, alert motorists on Detroit’s west side have been treated to an unusual sight. They have posted photos of what they’ve seen on social networking and even sent them to our office, in surprise and in puzzlement, but mostly in delight. What they have witnessed is a young rider on a Western saddle guiding his horse down West Seven Mile Road, past the gas stations and fast food restaurants, a sight that seems so out of place in the car-centric Motor City as to be remarkable.

Late this summer, the horseman finally calls and invites us to watch him ride. On a recent morning, we drive over to a house near the intersection of West Seven Mile Road and the Lodge Freeway. There we finally connect with 21-year-old Speed Miller, the “Greenfield Gaucho” we’d seen photographed so widely. He speaks with us while he carefully guides his 12-year-old Tennessee walking horse named Frisk out of a stock trailer, carefully grooming the animal, which eyes us contentedly.

Miller credits his love of horses to his grandfather, the elderly man who watches from the porch for a moment before allowing his grandson to handle the reporter and photographer. The elder has owned a 44-acre farm outside of Belleville for generations, and that’s where the young rider began his love affair with horses. That fascination began with his mother, who found encouragement from Miller’s grandfather when she climbed into the saddle decades ago.

“I was there all the time,” Miller says. “I was raised by my mom, but I spent every day with my grandad. My mom was always at work, so I’d be chilling with my grandad. I guess you could say that I was raised by both in a sense. I think me and my grandad are a little bit closer though, ’cause I spent most of my days with him. He taught me pretty much everything I know about these horses.”

[ ] when Miller began riding in the city and saw how young Detroiters connected with the animals, he realized he could offer them the same joy he found in horses.

“The kids were actually fascinated,” he says, “so I started bringing them out more, letting the kids touch them. Then, as I got more comfortable with the horse, I started putting the kids on the horse, just showing them a little something different. So I bring them down about twice a week. It’s kind of like a learning experience for both the children and the horse, in my eyes.”

Speed Miller and friend riding around the neighborhood. NOAH ELLIOTT MORRISON.
Speed Miller and friend riding around the neighborhood. NOAH ELLIOTT MORRISON.

‘When I get on the horse, everything else really don’t matter. I can ride down these streets in the toughest neighborhood. It really just don’t matter when I’m on the horse.’

Read more of this story at Detroit’s Metro Times »

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This puts us in mind of the Sir Winston Churchill quote:

 ‘There is something about the outside of a horse that is good for the inside of a man.’

Merlin a magician at survival

Well, it is more instinct than magic. A telling story all the same. —Editor.

Merlin, a wild horse, survived Hurricane Florence in quarantine on lands owned by the National Park Service. Photo courtesy of Kathy Knight/Foundation for Shackleford Horses.
Merlin, a wild horse, survived Hurricane Florence in quarantine on lands owned by the National Park Service. Photo courtesy of Kathy Knight/Foundation for Shackleford Horses.

Outer Banks horse left alone in pasture may have had to swim to survive hurricane

Cross-posted from the Charlotte Observer

Written by Mark Price

A mystery has emerged in the telling of how the Outer Banks’ wild horses survived Hurricane Florence.

Instincts dating back five centuries compel the feral mustangs to either huddle on high ground — butts to the wind — or seek refuge in the maritime forest during storms, say experts.

But news has come of a Shackleford Banks horse named Merlin who was fenced in an “inundated” quarantine site during the storm, according the Foundation for Shackleford Horses.

“Given the condition of the site, Merlin was likely in deep water during part of the storm. His water trough was full of salt water,” she said, noting two volunteers hiked an hour through mud and debris to find him.

“Candidly, (we) anticipated they would be much more likely to find Merlin’s body than Merlin himself. But despite the fact that the barn was destroyed and much of the fencing was covered with debris and even laying down in some areas, there was Merlin, prick-eared, bright-eyed, and happy to greet them.”

• Continue reading »  • View video story »

 

Scientists stumble upon 40,000 year old foal in Siberia

Ancient foal was found in the permafrost of the Batagaika depression. Via Sputnik News.
Ancient foal was found in the permafrost of the Batagaika depression. Via Sputnik News.

Sputnik News reports:

Scientists found an amazingly preserved 40,000 year old “baby horse” in the Siberian Permafrost.

The ancient foal was found in the permafrost of the Batagaika depression, also known as the “Gateway to the Underworld,” by Russian and Japanese scientists, and is expected to give researchers a wealth of new information on how horses evolved at a time when human beings were still mere hunter-gatherers.

The 40,000-year-old foal, believed to have passed away when she was just three months, was completely preserved by the permafrost before being discovered. It is now believed to be the world’s only fully-preserved ancient baby horse.

Discovered by scientists from the Scientific Research Institute of Applied Ecology of Russia’s North at North-Eastern Federal University, and researchers from the Japanese University of Kindai, along with a Fuji TV film crew, the Paleolithic find is believed to be a treasure trove of invaluable scientific information.

“The particular value of this unique find is that we have also obtained samples from the layers of soil where [she] laid preserved, meaning we will be able to restore a picture of the foal’s environment,” Semyon Grigoryev, the head of the renowned Mammoth Museum in Yakutsk, said, according to a university press release.

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