Disneyland opens new Circle D Ranch for its horses in Norco

The crew at Disneyland’s Circle D Ranch facility in Norco, post for a photo with two of the horses that stay there. Posing with the crew are Mickey Mouse, along with Mary Niven, vice president of the Disneyland Resort (in a light blue coat) and to the right of Mickey is Mikey Trujillo, Disneyland Ambassador. (Photo by Mark Eades, Orange County Register/SCNG)
The crew at Disneyland’s Circle D Ranch facility in Norco, post for a photo with two of the horses that stay there. Posing with the crew are Mickey Mouse, along with Mary Niven, vice president of the Disneyland Resort (in a light blue coat) and to the right of Mickey is Mikey Trujillo, Disneyland Ambassador. (Photo by Mark Eades, Orange County Register/SCNG)

CALIFORNIA (June 10, 2017 — Disneyland’s horses have a new place to roam as stables for the theme park’s equine population officially opened in Norco.

Called the Circle D Ranch, it takes the place of the previous Circle D Ranch that was located backstage at Disneyland. That old site is now under construction as part of the “Star Wars” land project scheduled to open up at the theme park in 2019.

“We looked for two years to find a place for our horses, and this location was the perfect fit,” said Mikey Trujillo, a Disneyland Ambassador speaking at the ribbon-cutting ceremony held Saturday, June 10, at the ranch.

One of the large horses at the Circle D Ranch in Norco, checks out all the visitors to the ranch on Saturday, June 10, during an open house at the Disneyland Resort owned facility. The ranch is now the home for the horses used at the Disneyland Resort to pull the Horse-Drawn Streetcars on Main Street U.S.A. and for other special events. (Photo by Mark Eades, Orange County Register/SCNG)
One of the large horses at the Circle D Ranch in Norco, checks out all the visitors to the ranch on Saturday, June 10, during an open house at the Disneyland Resort owned facility. The ranch is now the home for the horses used at the Disneyland Resort to pull the Horse-Drawn Streetcars on Main Street U.S.A. and for other special events. (Photo by Mark Eades, Orange County Register/SCNG)

Among the types of horses staying at the ranch are Percherons, Belgians, Brabants, Shires and Clydesdales, with one weighing in at nearly 2,000 pounds.   Continue reading »

Norco is a city in Riverside County, California, in the United States. According to city ordinances, the architecture of Norco “shall reflect a desired Western theme,” including qualities “described as rural, informal, traditional, rustic, low-profile and equestrian oriented.”

Horse Fund logo by © Vivian Grant Farrell.

Tuesday’s Horse is the Official Blog of The Horse Fund

Kentucky lawyer leases land to protect horses, plans sanctuary in coal country

JACKSON, Ky. (Source Article) —  Curtis Bostic is an attorney, a politician and — for a few weeks in 2016 — an accused horse thief.

On a cold December day in the rugged hilltops of Breathitt County, Bostic was trying to rescue some horses he said had been abandoned and were malnourished. But he was arrested by a sheriff’s deputy, who said the horses belonged to two men who follow the local custom of setting them free in the winter to wander the wilderness of the county’s abandoned coal fields.

The charges were later dismissed after the sheriff’s department said it didn’t have probable cause to make the arrest. But during the night Bostic spent in jail, he came up with an idea: A few weeks later, he leased the land where he had been arrested. He sent a letter to the two men who had pressed charges against him. Now, they were the trespassers, and Bostic ordered them to come get their horses before he put them up for adoption.

“I can’t change the full county. But I can say you are not going to come to my property and drop your horse off in the cold winter,” Bostic said.

Bostic wants to turn 4,000 acres of former coal mines into a horse sanctuary. It’s the latest idea on how to tackle the growing horse population in the mountains of Kentucky, a state known more for pampered thoroughbreds on pristine farms than bony horses roaming free.

Bostic’s descriptions of thousands of horses suffering at the hands of cruel owners have offended the locals who say he doesn’t understand their culture.

Clifton Hudson, 30, owns five horses that he sets free to wander land he doesn’t own near his home in Breathitt County. He said he provides 600 pounds of salt each month for the horses. He stopped hauling hay bales to the land because the horses were not eating them, a sign he says means they have plenty of grass to graze. The locals often bring their children to the mountains on the weekends to pet and feed the horses.

“It’s just really it’s more of a pastime than anything else with the people of the county,” Hudson said. “So far the only person really had an issue with it has been Mr. Bostic.”

Wild horses have been a familiar sight in the Kentucky mountains for decades. But following the Great Recession and the thousands of jobs lost because of the disappearing coal industry, more horses have been set loose. Read the full story »

Source: WCPO Cincinnati. Report originally filed by the Associated Press. Written by Adam Beam . Featured image by Jervis Pics.

High-end horses: The ultimate jet setters

Cross-posted from CNN
Featured Image: Filed with this Report

by HEATHER BUCHANAN for CNN

(CNN)When the world’s best athletes travel they receive first class treatment from expedited security to special meals to extra legroom. The same is true for the four-legged world of top show jumping horses.

With major horse show competitions in Shanghai, Paris, Rome, Madrid, Los Angeles, and Palm Beach and the Olympics in Rio, these horses may have more frequent flier miles than many people.

Horses on this international circuit can cost as much as $10 million dollars and their health and safety is of utmost importance, as well as to arrive at the next horse show rested and ready to go for the blue ribbon.

Soaring across a six foot fence is one thing — soaring across an ocean is another.

Door to door

Special horse charter companies provide stall door to stall door service, picking the horse up at its home barn and transporting it in a specially air conditioned van to the airport, in the US most likely Miami or New York.

Their horse passport and health certificate are checked, and a vet will make sure they are fit for travel.

In the animal version of a VIP lounge they are kept comfortable until ready to board, then put in a special traveling stall which has good ventilation, a vibration-minimizing floor to keep those four legs from getting stressed and space to see the other horses.

These stalls are raised on a lift on the tarmac to be put in the cargo hold where special flight attendants or professional flying grooms ensure their comfort. Pilots even fly a special low ascent and descent to minimize the trajectory angle and are particularly keen to avoid bad weather.

First class, business, or coach translates into a stall which is divided for only one, two or three horses, and prices to fly from the US to Europe are usually in the $10,000 range each way.

Read full story »

Photo: Cyber Horse on display during Cyberweek in Tel Aviv

A close-up of the head of 'Cyber Horse,' made from thousands of infected computer and cell phone bits, is on display at the entrance to the annual Cyberweek conference at Tel Aviv University in Israel on Monday. Amir Cohen/Reuters.
A close-up of the head of ‘Cyber Horse,’ made from thousands of infected computer and cell phone bits, is on display at the entrance to the annual Cyberweek conference at Tel Aviv University in Israel on Monday. Amir Cohen/Reuters. (Click to enlarge).

 

Isn’t this amazing? Here’s a video of its installation. I think I see my errant old keyboard.