Tag Archives: big bend ranch state park

West Texas State Park that shot burros sends 11 horses to slaughter

    Texas Parks & Wildlife Department Logo

    Julie Caramante, a lifelong equine welfare advocate, has kept a close eye on the horse slaughter industry. Following a tip off, Caramante investigated the sale of horses by Big Bend Ranch State Park to known killer buyer Ruben Brito.

    Among the documents she obtained is the following email exchange:

    “Have you been able to determine if we can move forward with this process of culling the horse herd at BBRSP?” wrote Dierdre Hisler, Region 1 State Parks Director.

    “I don’t recall receiving an answer (could be lost in my e-mails) to my question about sell pricing,” Sholly responded. “Are we willing to take canner prices for our horses? Is that all they are worth? No blood lines? No high potential for more than dog food?”

    Hisler responded that the horses “are not of QUALITY,” and Sholly okayed the sale for $.25 per pound.

    Kevin Good, an assistant to the TPWD director explains the need to cull the horses this way.

    “As horses do sometimes, they made baby horses,” he said. “The herd got to a size where it had to be reduced.”

    Guess they never heard of gelding.

    Burro shot and killed during Big Bend Ranch State Park cull. Google image.
    Burro shot and killed during Big Bend Ranch State Park cull. Google image.

    Big Bend Ranch State Park stirred up a storm of controversy earlier this year by shooting burros as part of a cull.

    “First the park shoots the burros and now sends the horses directly to a killer,” writes Caramante in an email. “Guess they don’t like anything equine.”

    Source: Dallas Observer Blog, Unfair Park; by Eric Nicholson; Aug. 21, 2012.

Texas suspends wild burro killing policy at Big Bend Ranch State Park

Cheyenne Rondeaux, 9, of Alpine, Texas, sits in the shade on Hannah a baby mammoth donkey, during a ride to the State Capitol by the Wild Burro Protection League and members of Red Horse Nation. Gov. Rick Perry refused to accept the hand delivered petitions. Image Rodolfo American-Statesman.

BETSY BLANEY reporting for the ASSOCIATED PRESS writes:

The Texas wildlife agency said Tuesday it is suspending a policy that allows the killing of burros in a state park along the Mexican border after the Humane Society of the United States offered to devise a nonlethal plan to remove the destructive animals.

The Texas Parks and Wildlife Department will contribute up to $10,000 toward a humane society aerial survey of the wild donkeys at Big Bend Ranch State Park this spring to establish baseline data, agency executive director Carter Smith said.

“We believe this could be valuable information to assess the problem with burros around the park,” Smith said. “We still have a long way to go to see if a viable, long-term plan can be developed.” Continue reading >>

In a post written by Tawnee Preisner, Vice President of Horse Plus Humane Society, Smith says he is “cautiously optimistic” a resolution can be found, but if not, they will return to their lethal control policy, in other words, gunning down wild burros to make way for Big Horn Sheep.

We will see if this turns out to be good news for any of the sheep or the burros.

If both are killed, it will benefit man by way of big revenues gained from the deaths these animals. Hunting licenses for Big Horn Sheep can reach as high as $100,000 per license.

Protesters clomp to Capitol to oppose state’s feral burro policy

Cross-posted from the Austin-American Statesman

Written by PATRICK BEACH

Cheyenne Rondeaux, 9, of Alpine, Texas, sits in the shade on Hannah a baby mammoth donkey, during a ride to the State Capitol by the Wild Burro Protection League and members of Red Horse Nation on Wednesday. Image Rodolfo Gonzales / American-Statesman.

Opponents of killing feral burros in Big Bend Ranch State Park deliver petitions to statehouse

AUSTIN, TX (Jan. 18, 2012) — At a Statehouse dominated by elephants, the donkey got some love in a short parade in downtown Austin on Wednesday.

The occasion was a protest of the Texas Parks & Wildlife Department’s shoot-to-kill policy concerning feral burros in Big Bend Ranch State Park. Marjorie Farabee , founder of the Wild Burro Protection League, had a helper drop some 103,000 petitions against shooting the burros at Lt. Gov. David Dewhurst’s office.

“Because Gov. Perry’s office refused authorization of delivery,” Farabee said. “Be sure you write that.”

Farabee and about 15 of her fellow protesters rode or led six donkeys — the recalcitrant Nancy refused to budge from the parking lot where the group’s parade started — for a few blocks from a nearby staging area to the Capitol. The group takes issue with the state’s position that the burros are non-native and that most of the animals were abandoned from ranches in nearby Mexico or are descendants of those animals.

The state further argues that the burros’ presence is a threat to indigenous species in a fragile ecosystem, trampling food and fouling scarce water resources. The state’s policy is to trap or kill the animals. But because of their intelligence, burros are easier to drop with a rifle than to catch. Read full story, view slideshow >>