Future of horse slaughter in Oklahoma uncertain; grisly find in Florida

FUTURE OF HORSE SLAUGHTER IN OKLAHOMA STILL UNCLEAR
From BeaumontEnterprise.com
by ASSOCIATED PRESS

Horse walks death row to slaughter. Humane Farm Association photograph.
Horse walks death row to slaughter. Humane Farm Association photo.

OKLAHOMA CITY (AP) — Though the Legislature passed a bill this year authorizing the slaughter of horses, it remains unclear whether a facility will open in Oklahoma once the law takes effect Nov. 1.

Gov. Mary Fallin signed into law the bill sponsored by Rep. Skye McNiel of Bristow and Sen. Eddie Fields of Wynona. Fields said he’s not aware of any efforts to build a facility in Oklahoma, while McNiel said she’s no longer involved in the issue.

“My goal is not necessarily to bring one,” McNiel said. “I am not out promoting it. Once I passed the bill, I was done.”

Before the law passed, Ahsan Amil of Oklahoma Meat Company applied for a federal inspection with the U.S. Department of Agriculture. Amil told the Tulsa World (http://bit.ly/16oj24G ) that he’s no longer pursuing the permit.

Horse slaughter plants are planned in New Mexico, Iowa, Missouri and Tennessee. Read more >>

WE SAY

L to R: Gov. Mary Fallin, Sen. Eddie Fields and Rep. Skye McNiel - Oklahoma politicians responsible for paving the way to bring horse slaughter to their State and returning it to US soil. Compilation of Google images.
L to R: Gov. Mary Fallin, Sen. Eddie Fields and Rep. Skye McNiel – Oklahoma politicians responsible for paving the way to bring horse slaughter to their State and returning it to US soil. Compilation of Google images.

— About the Lawmakers

Remember these names when it comes time to vote Oklahoma.

Gov. Mary Fallin
Rep. Skye McNiel of Bristow
Sen. Eddie Fields of Wynona

Does not matter why they passed a law to legalize horse slaughter in Oklahoma or whether or not they are involved after the fact or promoting it now they have “done their job”.

These politicians care not a wit about bringing all the sordid problems that go with horse slaughter to their community. Their view of horses as a disposable commodity is deadly — that horses are good for a buck in their killing for meat.

Notwithstanding that, horses are not traditional food animals and are given a laundry list of drugs that make their meat potentially carcinogenic to humans. Condoning the production and supply of toxic horse meat is highly irresponsible no matter how you cut it.

When you see those expensive election campaign ads for politicians such as the ones above, you can reasonably wonder if it is blood money from horse slaughter that helped pay for them.

— About Farm Bureaus

And what about the Farm Bureaus, who always seem to play a prominent role in working to keep horse slaughter alive? They have to know about the dangerous drugs given to horses which prohibit them from entering the human food chain.

Oh, wait. I wonder if it is because they know what sorts of things that go into the animals they breed, raise and kill for food, and simply don’t see any difference. That’s something to chew on, isn’t it?

GRISLY FIND IN MIAMI GARDENS, FLORIDA
From The Miami Herald
by ELINOR J. BRECHER

The butchered remains of a horse were found in a driveway on Northwest 163rd Street early Wednesday, according to Miami Gardens Police.

“The slaughter of horses in our community continues unabated,” said Laurie Waggoner, director of operations for the South Florida Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals, whose organization provides rescue and refuge for abused and neglected horses. “The only difference in this case, is the remains were disposed of in an extremely public area.”

A passerby called police at 8:05 a.m. Wednesday reporting a “dead carcass” at 5295 NW 163rd St.

The horse was slaughtered while still alive, said SPCA President Jeanette Jordan.

Close-up photos show the horse’s severed head and other body parts lying on pavement.

“My greatest hope is that the perpetrators of this hideous crime will be caught and prosecuted to the full extent of the law,” Jordan said.

Illegal horse slaughter for meat is common in certain parts of Miami-Dade County, though it’s against the law to sell such meat for human consumption.

Police said they had no leads in the case. Read more >>

Mayor wants tough horse slaughter law

Former racehorse Marco was stolen and slaughtered near his home in Southwest Ranches, Florida.
Former racehorse Marco was stolen and slaughtered near his home in Southwest Ranches, Florida.
Former racehorse Marco was stolen and slaughtered near his home in Southwest Ranches, Florida. Anyone with information about the case is asked to call BSO at 954-765-4321.

Cross-posted from NBC News Channel 6 South Florida

Written by BRIAN HAMACHER

FLORIDA (Oct. 25, 2012) — Officials in Southwest Ranches are taking on the South Florida horse slaughter problem with a new measure that would be one of the most stringent equine protection laws in the state.

The Equine Protection Act, named Marco’s Law after a racehorse that was found slaughtered in the town in August, would carry strict penalties and incarceration for anyone who willfully kills, maims, mutilates or causes great bodily harm or permanent disability to any horse in the town.

Violators would be subject to a minimum mandatory fine of $5,000 and minimum mandatory period of incarceration. The law will be voted on during the Town Council meeting Thursday night. Read more >>

RELATED READING

Broward Sheriff’s Office search for horse slaughter suspects

Broward Sheriff’s Office search for horse slaughter suspects

Former racehorse Marco was stolen and slaughtered near his home in Southwest Ranches, Florida.
Former racehorse Marco was stolen and slaughtered near his home in Southwest Ranches, Florida.
Former racehorse Marco was stolen and slaughtered two blocks from his home in Southwest Ranches, Florida. Anyone with information about the case is asked to call BSO at 954-765-4321.

by LOCAL 10 NEWS MIAMI, FLORIDA

SOUTHWEST RANCHES, Fla. – The Broward Sheriff’s Office was looking for thieves Tuesday who stole a horse and then slaughtered him about two blocks from his home in Southwest Ranches.

About 7 a.m. Saturday, David Sangiao-Parga told deputies Marco, his 8-year-old retired racehorse, had been stolen on Friday from Just Perfect Landscaping at 5345 Southwest 210th Terrace. Marco was rescued after breaking his leg several years ago.

The thieves climbed a fence and led the horse away from the stables along a canal bank on the back of the property, said deputies. A second horse was left behind.

The stolen horse was found about two blocks away at South Eastern Fish Farms about 5:30 p.m. Saturday. Deputies said the hind quarters and two large sections of the horse’s back had been removed.

“It’s hard, I think, for people who don’t own a horse to understand because it’s a different kind of bond you have with pets,” said Sangiao-Parga. “They have, you know, it’s almost like another family member.”

Anyone with information about the case is asked to call BSO at 954-765-4321.

ESPN to air horse slaughter segment week of Kentucky Derby

ESPN will air a special segment of E:60, Tuesday, May 3, 2011 at 7 pm, on the slaughter of racehorses taking place in the Miami area of Florida to supply the black market demand for horse meat for human consumption.

“Inside the Horse Meat Black Market” airs the week of the Kentucky Derby to draw attention to the plight of the percentage of racehorses who end their days illegally slaughtered.

The E:60 special will highlight the dramatic rescue of Freedom’s Flight by Richard “Kudo” Couto during undercover operations that exposed these horrific crimes, eventually leading to a state law criminalizing the slaughter of horses in this manner. Freedom’s Flight is a Thoroughbred racehorse and grandson of the legendary Secretariat.

Still largely unknown to the public and described as racing’s “dirty secret”, a portion of Thoroughbreds too slow or no longer fit to race are cast off by their owners and trainers and sent to slaughter in licensed plants to supply horse meat to gourmet diners in Europe and Japan.

Kudo is the founder and president of ARM, the Animal Recovery Mission, and a volunteer for the South Florida SPCA. As of September 1, 2010, Kudo has been instrumental in shutting down more than 75 farms illegally butchering horses for human consumption. The fight continues with 150 known farms remaining, according to ARM’s website.

E:60 is ESPN’s prime-time newsmagazine featuring profiles, investigations and cutting-edge stories on emerging and established sports. E:60 airs Tuesdays at 7 p.m. ET on ESPN through May 10.