Hollendorfer wins his lawsuit to return to racing

Jerry Hollendorfer racehorse trainer, killer and doper. Racing Post image.

Sometimes there seems little justice in life, but was trainer Jerry Hollendorfer made the poster boy for the rash of racecourse deaths in the killing fields of California racing? He was asked to take his horses and move out of Santa Anita following the reported 30 deaths that caught national headlines, and some of which he was responsible for.

In the hot glare of the negative publicity swirling around those racehorse killings, horse racing desperately needed to look like they were doing something, and banishing Hollendorfer seemed like that something.

Hollendorfer tried other racetracks who said, yes, okay, we’ll let you in, only to change their minds. When he applied at Del Mar and they said no dice, he sued them.

ESPN reports:

Hall of Fame jockey Jerry Hollendorfer is now allowed to train and race horses at Del Mar following a ruling Friday in a San Diego courtroom.

Hollendorfer had sued Del Mar earlier this month after the Southern California racetrack refused to allow him to enter races during the track’s meet or keep his horses in the track’s stalls. He sought an injunction to allow him to race at the track, and San Diego County Superior Court Judge Ronald Frazier granted that request.

The suit was filed after the track declined to give him stalls due to “[public-relations] risks and considerations,” according to court filings. Hollendorfer had previously been banned at Santa Anita and Golden Gate Park, two tracks owned by The Stronach Group, after four of his horses died during the Santa Anita meet, completed last month, where 30 horses were euthanized.

The response to the lawsuit by Del Mar attorneys alleges that during the meeting June 28 where they told Hollendorfer he wouldn’t be allowed to participate, his attorney said, “We get it. Jerry’s radioactive. We get it.”

Horse racing is radioactive. A toxic killer of horses.

And we strongly object to the use of the more pleasant sounding term “euthanized” when these racehorses catastrophically and painfully broke down and had to be killed to put them out of their misery. Insured too, no doubt.

In the meantime, “according to Equibase, Hollendorfer horses have won 7,623 races in his training career and have collected purses of $199,932,748,” reports the same ESPN article.

Who writes this stuff? The horses have collected purses of . . . ? Yes, we know what they mean. Still.

Blood money.


IMAGE
Racing Post image. Not filed with ESPN story.

See also “The Slow and Merciless Death of American Horse Racing“, Tuesday’s Horse, May 28, 2019

Horse Racing Wrongs: Last week’s broken, bleeding and dead

Barbaro after he suffered the fatal breaks that eventually claimed his life. The carnage and suffering continues throughout thoroughbred and quarter horse racing. Image Source: Bryant Photos.
Barbaro after he suffered the fatal breaks that eventually claimed his life. The carnage and suffering continues throughout thoroughbred and quarter horse racing. Image Source: Bryant Photos.

Patrick Buttello reports and protests the mayhem and deaths associated with U.S. horse racing on a continual basis. Here is a sample of his work. Lest we forget. There is much more on his website.

Last week in U.S. Thoroughbred and QuarterHorse Racing (Equibase)

Compiled by Patrick Buttello at HorseRacingWrongs »

You Know Too “was pulled up in distress…vanned off” at Delaware
Blame Logan “vanned off” at Louisiana
Obscene Britches “took a bad step” at Mountaineer – subsequently confirmed dead
Miss Q Who “vanned off” at Zia
Afleet Destiny “fell, DNF” at Parx
No Sham Here “vanned off” at Zia
Super Mama “bled” at Belmont
Benny Special “vanned home” at Indiana
Cheray “vanned home” at Indiana
Kieran Street “fell, DNF” at Finger Lakes – subsequently confirmed dead
Swiss Alps “vanned off” at Gulfstream
Avro “vanned off in severe distress” at Belterra
Coach’s Dream “vanned off” at Churchill
Meadow Storm “vanned off” at Penn
Scottsgold “vanned off” at Penn
Tollie Rossel “bled during the race” at Prairie
Ta Ta Nomoro “fell suddenly, van off” at Remington
Windy Cape “in distress, vanned off” at Belterra – subsequently confirmed dead
Martha Rose “in distress, vanned off” at Belterra – subsequently confirmed dead
Category Two “pulled up in distress…euthanized” at Charles Town
Jess Doit “vanned off” at Los Alamitos
Linnaeus “bled from the nostrils and mouth” at Remington
Appoggiatura “fell over the last fence” at Shawan
Moss Code “collided with fallen horse [above] and brought down” at Shawan
Dee Favorite Girl “bled, vanned off” at Zia
Approximator “vanned off” at Belterra
Fly B “vanned off” at Los Alamitos
Jess Wong “vanned off” at Los Alamitos
Abets Abet “returned bleeding from both nostrils” at Parx
Jessaspecial “bled” at Prairie

#  #  #

DNF=Did Not Finish (complete the race)

Locomotives sitting atop toothpicks

We leave you with this quote.

THOROUGHBRED RACEHORSES

“Our horses are sick. Our thoroughbreds are thoroughly inbred. They are locomotives sitting atop toothpicks. They are fragile and friable, designed to run but not to recover from running. And each time they break down or wear out, we chalk it up to an individual horse’s shortcomings, rather than the decades-long decline of the entire breeding industry”.

— Barry Petchesky (Deadspin)

Quote from “Our Racehorses are Broken America »

Read more at Horse Fund’s Horse Racing Reports »

Please Share

Please tag and share, retweet, gram etc. Thank you!

Eight Belles — racing 10 years on

Horse in profile silhouetted against a night sky. Unattributed Google search image.

by JANE ALLIN

The Kentucky Derby this Saturday marks the tenth anniversary of the catastrophic breakdown of Eight Belles. Racing with the boys, she crossed the wire 4 ¾ lengths behind Big Brown, finishing second – the first filly since 1999 to run in the Derby — only to collapse with two shattered ankles and be euthanized on the track.

Memories of Barbaro’s anguishing ordeal, fresh in the minds of racing fans and the death of another horse on Kentucky Oaks day, cast a pall over North America’s most celebrated racing event and raised questions about the safety of horse racing.

Immediately the racing industry responded with the notion that more uniform regulations regarding equine health standards and drug use should be a top priority.

Ten long years and what has improved? Nothing.

Year after year, the industry holds conference after conference claiming that they are moving towards improved safety standards. Sadly, the efforts of the few that do care and want change, are lost to the greed of the rest.

These innocent souls are sacrificed to casino profits, allowance races, graded and graded stakes races and when they fail, relegated to claiming races and the slaughterhouse. It is estimated that 20% of slaughtered horses in North America are thoroughbreds — some picked up by the meat man at the track and sold by unscrupulous trainers and owners after a bad race, without a hope of finding a home. Disposed as garbage. Just throw-away items.

In fact, it seems the opposite to what the racing industry claims has happened.

The transparency, if there ever was any, is gone.

The doping continues, the trainers and veterinarians are one step ahead of the newest drug testing, the records available about trainer infractions are incomplete where serious penalties are hidden from the public, statistics only report deaths if a horse dies during a race, and horses, despite what the industry claims, continue to die in record numbers, all hidden from the public’s view.

All of this is a cover up, blatant lies, to attempt to convince everyone that the industry is above board.

Horse racing is a cruel, predatory business. You bet, they die.


QUOTES

Eight Belles

“She ran with the heart of a locomotive, on champagne-glass ankles.” Blaming the breeders and investors, sports writer Sally Jenkins claimed,”thoroughbred racing is in a moral crisis, and everyone now knows it.”

Thoroughbred Racehorses

“Our horses are sick. Our thoroughbreds are thoroughly inbred. They are locomotives sitting atop toothpicks. They are fragile and friable, designed to run but not to recover from running. And each time they break down or wear out, we chalk it up to an individual horse’s shortcomings, rather than the decades-long decline of the entire breeding industry”.  — Barry Petchesky (Deadspin)

Insightful Perspective

“What he liked about horse racing was the minimal investment and the high returns. He didn’t mind horses at all; they were easy on the eyes and exciting to watch.”

“The horse industry in general was a zero-waste proposition: this was one animal you could take from birth, exploit all its qualities – speed, strength, tractability – through breeding, racing, eventing, caléche or companion service, and then profit from its flesh when it had outlived its usefulness.”

From the Book, GROUND MANNERS, A NOVEL, by Cynthia D’Errico »

Related Reading

More by Jane Allin including the groundbreaking The Chemical Horse »

Racehorse Memorial Wall Worldwide, began 2005 »

Horse Racing Wrongs, began 2014 »

©The Horse Fund

How one snapped, dangling leg changed a heart forever

Horse in profile silhouetted against a night sky. Unattributed Google search image.

LOUISVILLE, Ky. (Horse Racing) — It’s Derby Day, Louisville’s biggest event of the year, even bigger than Christmas and most likely generates more revenue than that blessed event ever will.

There is nothing blessed about horse racing, especially the drug and death riddled variety put on in the USofA.

An example of whereof we speak was published yesterday by Horse Racing Wrongs by Patrick Battuello who catalogs the day to day death and disarray that is horse racing American style.

Here’s an excerpt or go there now.

As the horses were crossing the finish line, I noticed one stopped very abruptly and the little man on his back fell off onto the ground. The horse that had stopped was Mariano. As the other horses passed him, it became clear to me what the issue was. One of his front legs had completely snapped in half and was now dangling, held on by nothing more than the horse’s thin skin. I looked around and there were a few startled faces, but the vast majority just looked the other way or simply said to me “that’s just part of horse racing… it happens.” I knew right away that Mariano would be killed shortly after breaking his leg and that the races would continue on as if nothing happened. So I left, never to return.

There was something off about him breaking his leg. He didn’t trip. He didn’t fall. He didn’t run into any other horses. I know because I was standing RIGHT there. He was just a few feet away from me. He was just running. And then he wasn’t anymore.

Read the full story »

U.S. horse racing earlier this year patted itself on the back saying that fatalities were down again for another year.

We could be wrong but we suspect they are cooking the books or racetracks are under reporting, or possibly both. Reporting is purely voluntary and some breakdowns and deaths are not reported, so the public never has any true idea of what goes on. That’s how they like it. That’s how they want it. That’s how it’s going to be.

This is typical of a deadly, destructive industry living in a world according to its own order. Who is to hold them accountable. Horse racing has no Commissioner like other “sports”.  No one in particular is “in charge”. Millions and millions are bet on it. Don’t you find this odd?

Racehorses are the innocent victims of this ongoing barbarity. Will they ever be free? When will it all end?

READ MORE

If you think we are exaggerating, check out “10 Dark Secrets From the World of Horse Racing” from Listverse.com.

QUOTE

We leave you with this quote by Barry Petchesky, “Our Racehorses are broken America”, Deadspin.

“Our horses are sick. Our thoroughbreds are thoroughly inbred. They are locomotives sitting atop toothpicks. They are fragile and friable, designed to run but not to recover from running. And each time they break down or wear out, we chalk it up to an individual horse’s shortcomings, rather than the decades-long decline of the entire breeding industry”.

—-

FEATURED IMAGE
Horse in profile silhouetted against a night sky. Unattributed Google search image.