Take action against horse racing. Contact your State Governor.

California Gavin Newsom

We are calling on all Californians to contact Governor Newsom’s office by phone or contact form to shut down California horse racing — particularly Santa Anita. Tweet your message to @GavinNewsom.

Do you have horse racing in your State?

Please contact your Governor and voice your opposition to horse racing and it’s horrific history of maiming, abusing and killing of racehorses. Let’s get the ball rolling and establish momentum on this issue. Find Governor contact information by State here.

Thank you everyone.

If you have not seen the video, “Real Sports with Bryant Gumbel: Raced to Death”, please go here.

 

Horse Racing. It’s clear that not enough has changed says Feinstein

U.S. Sen. Dianne Feinstein.

Senator Dianne Feinstein (D-Calif.) released the following statement after Mongolian Groom was euthanized due to injuries sustained while racing in the Breeders’ Cup Classic at Santa Anita in Arcadia, Calif., on Saturday.

Note: Video follows the Senator’s statement.

“It breaks my heart to hear that another horse died because of injuries sustained during the Breeders’ Cup at Santa Anita Racetrack. This year, 37 horses have died at Santa Anita, seven of those since racing resumed in September. That’s simply unacceptable.

“This problem is not unique to Santa Anita. More than 3,000 horses have died at California racetracks in the past two decades, and thousands more at racetracks throughout the country. Unfortunately, most states lack sufficient reporting requirements, so we may never know the exact numbers of horses that die nation-wide as part of the horse racing industry. This is a gap that should be closed.

“Before the Breeders’ Cup, I wrote to the California Horse Racing Board that this weekend would be a critical test for the future of horse racing. Despite increased scrutiny and additional measures that have been put in place, the horse racing industry was unable to make it through a single weekend without a critical injury and euthanized horse.

“In the past, I’ve called for horse racing to be suspended at Santa Anita until it could ensure the safety of horses would be protected. With continued racetrack deaths, it’s clear that not enough has changed, so I renew that call.

“I will work with Governor Newsom to look at all options to protect racehorses and increase transparency at racetracks. If the horse racing industry is unwilling to treat these magnificent creatures humanely, it has no business operating in the United States.”

Pre-existing Condition?

Update (Nov. 5, 2019): The following was tweeted showing Mongolian Groom being jogged on the track on raceday. Look at his motion and how he is favoring his near hind, the one that fractured and subsequently resulted his death. There are some ignorant comments saying he is moving that way because he was between a jog and a canter. Do not be fooled by these horse racing apologists.

Did the exercise rider warn anyone? If he did, nobody cared.

R.I.P. Mongolian Groom

Mongolian Groom was the 37th horse to break down and die at Santa Anita since December. Mongolian Groom’s obvious mental and physical distress is heartbreaking. Why put the screens up? Let people see what their gambling money is paying for.

The End.

California “Easy Fire” horses and emergency preparation tips

Stephanie Nagler, right, helps evacuate horses from the Sullivan Canyon Equestrian Community in Brentwood on Tuesday.(Mel Melcon / Los Angeles Times)

Not All Heroes Wear Capes

A touching video captures the moment a brave horse galloped back into a roadside area overcome by thick smoke — despite rescuers’ attempts to corral him — to bring two other horses to safety as the Easy Fire raged in Ventura County.

“From the #EasyFire in Simi Valley — this thoroughbred goes back into the blaze to get his family,” Rex Chapman posted to Twitter Thursday. “Not all heroes wear capes . . .”

Dorany Pineda of the The LA Times reported:

The Easy fire, which broke out shortly after 6 a.m. near Easy Street and Madera Road, has forced thousands of people from their homes as officials try to keep flames from overtaking neighborhoods.

Volunteers help evacuate horses during the Easy Fire, Wednesday, Oct. 30, 2019, in Simi Valley, Calif. (Christian Monterrosa/AP)
Volunteers help evacuate horses during the Easy Fire, Wednesday, Oct. 30, 2019, in Simi Valley, Calif. (Christian Monterrosa/AP)

The equestrian community has consistently come together during fires. Volunteers often find people who need help through word-of-mouth or on social media, especially through a Facebook group called Southern California Equine Emergency Evacuation.

Cheryl Kanan evacuates with her horse Aries as the Easy fire approaches Wednesday, Oct. 30, 2019, in Simi Valley, Calif. A new wildfire erupted Wednesday in wind-whipped Southern California, forcing the evacuation of the Ronald Reagan Presidential Library and nearby homes, as both ends of the state struggled with blazes, dangerously gusty weather and deliberate blackouts. (AP Photo/Marcio Jose Sanchez)
Cheryl Kanan evacuates with her horse Aries as the Easy fire approaches Wednesday, Oct. 30, 2019, in Simi Valley, Calif. A new wildfire erupted Wednesday in wind-whipped Southern California, forcing the evacuation of the Ronald Reagan Presidential Library and nearby homes, as both ends of the state struggled with blazes, dangerously gusty weather and deliberate blackouts. (AP Photo/Marcio Jose Sanchez)

Ms Pineda posted these superb tips to get and keep you prepared in case of an emergency regarding pets and large animals such as horses. Thank you Ms Pineda and the LA Times.

Preparing Pets for Emergencies

Before an emergency strikes:

  • Microchip your pets and make sure they have proper and up-to-date identification. If you’re separated from your animals, a microchip will increase your chances of reuniting with them.
  • Include phone numbers of out-of-area friends or family in your microchip registration. It’s a good idea to include alternate contacts in case you can’t be reached.Locate pet-friendly lodgings.
  • Contact hotels and motels in and outside of your city and ask if they accept pets during emergencies.
  • Do the same for boarding facilities. Know where they are and visit them.
  • Get your pet used to being in a kennel. It’ll make it easier to transport them.
  • Paste a rescue alert sticker visibly on one of your home’s windows with the number and species of animals in your household. (If you evacuate with your pets, write “Evacuated” on the sticker.)

Preparing Large Animals for Emergencies

  • Microchip the animal or wrap an identification bracelet around one of his feet.
  • Train your horse or other large animal to load into a trailer.
  • If possible, make prior arrangements for boarding at stables outside of your city.
  • Store important documents and paperwork in cloud storage or several hard drives. It’s a good idea to give one to a friend or family who lives outside of your community.

Make a Large Animal Evacuation Kit

Include the following:

FOOD

  • Drums or barrels of water, enough for at least three days.
  • A list of all medicines and their doses and if possible, an extra supply of medication. Make sure to check their expiration dates regularly.
  • Rope and leather halters. Don’t use nylon halters. They can melt from extreme heat and burn the animal.

IMPORTANT DOCUMENTS AND PAPERWORK

  • Copies of ownership records
  • Vaccination and health records
  • Microchip paperwork

IDENTIFICATION

  • Photos of brands
  • Photos of your large animal that show any distinctive marks or tattoos

It is never recommended that you leave your large animal behind or let him loose during an emergency. The Department of Animal Services offers assistance for large animal transportation.

If you have a horse and absolutely can’t evacuate with him and have to set him loose, the National Fire Protection Assn. suggests you make sure to mark or attach your contact information on him by:

  • Shaving it into his coat
  • Braiding an identification tag into his mane
    Attaching it onto a neck band
  • Writing it on his side with spray paint or a livestock marker

Be sure to have an evacuation kit ready.

CHRB suspends trainer John Martin after 3 horses test positive

Golden Gate Fields. Photographer Unknown.

ALBANY — A Southern California trainer has been suspended for one year by Golden Gate Fields stewards after three horses in his care tested positive for a banned drug, the California Horse Racing Board announced Tuesday.

Owner/trainer John Martin of Marina del Rey had half of the suspension stayed as long as he does not commit any other serious medication violations, state racing officials said in a news release.

Martin, who has 1,941 victories in 7,631 starts, according to Equibase, also was fined $20,000.

Three horses Martin ran at Golden Gate Fields in Albany and the Big Fresno Fair tested positive for ergoloid mesylates, state officials said. Ergoloid mesylates are used to treat Alzheimer’s and certain mood disorders in humans, according to the horse racing board. State officials said the drug is thought to be used in racing as an anti-bleeding treatment.

Source: https://www.mercurynews.com/2019/10/01/state-officials-ban-golden-gate-fields-trainer-for-drug-offense/ »

 *  *  *  *

We looked up ergoloid mysylates. See below. We still don’t what the heck it is. Is it really an anti-bleeder, or simply makes you feel happy, feel no pain type of happy that is. Not that we really need to know. The list of illicit drugs given to racehorses is seemingly bottomless. However, it’s interesting about Albert Hofmann, being the discoverer of LSD. Totally unrelated no doubt, except LSD has been given to racehorses. It was the 70s but you know . . . and, . . . never mind.

“Ergoloid mesylates (USAN), co-dergocrine mesilate (BAN) or dihydroergotoxine mesylate, trade name Hydergine, is a mixture of the methanesulfonate salts of three dihydrogenated ergot alkaloids (dihydroergocristine, dihydroergocornine, and alpha- and beta-dihydroergocryptine).

It was developed by Albert Hofmann (the discoverer of LSD) for Sandoz (now part of Novartis).”

“The more you know, the more you know you don’t know.” —Aristotle.

We only quote from the best. Ta-ra.