Calif. Sen. Feinstein to Forest Service: Do not slaughter wild horses

Sen. Dianne Feinstein, D-Calif, speaks at a Capitol Hill news conference in Washington. (AP Photo/Ann Heisenfelt)
Sen. Dianne Feinstein, D-Calif, speaks at a Capitol Hill news conference in Washington. (AP Photo/Ann Heisenfelt)

WASHINGTON, D.C. (Oct. 9, 2018) —Senator Dianne Feinstein (D-Calif.) today called on the Forest Service to halt the sale of wild horses in California until concerns over potential horse slaughter are addressed.

“I write to request that you provide details as to the wild horse roundup that is set to begin tomorrow on the Modoc National Forest,” Senator Feinstein wrote. “According to the Forest Service webpage for the Modoc National Forest, the removal of ‘approximately 1,000’ wild horses from Devil’s Garden Plateau Wild Horse Territory in Northern California is set to begin as early as tomorrow, October 10th. According to the Forest Service, this is the first roundup of wild horses of this type in 13 years.”

Full text of the letter  is as follows:

October 9, 2018

Vicki Christiansen
Acting Chief, U.S. Forest Service
United States Department of Agriculture
1400 Independence Avenue, SW
Washington, D.C. 20250

Dear Acting Chief Christiansen:

I write to request that you provide details as to the wild horse roundup that is set to begin tomorrow on the Modoc National Forest. According to the Forest Service webpage for the Modoc National Forest, the removal of “approximately 1,000” wild horses from Devil’s Garden Plateau Wild Horse Territory in Northern California is set to begin as early as tomorrow, October 10th. According to the Forest Service, this is the first roundup of wild horses of this type in 13 years.

I understand that the Forest Service and the Bureau of Land Management have a statutory obligation under the Wild Free-Roaming Horses and Burros Act of 1971 to protect wild horses and burros on federal land. However, it is also possible that many of these animals will end up being sold to slaughterhouses. I ask that you promptly respond to the following questions and halt any sales of wild horses until I receive a response to the following questions:

  1. How does the Forest Service determine the appropriate management levels (AMLs) for wild horses on the Modoc National Forest?
  2. How does the agency meet the requirements of the 1971 Act to “achieve and maintain a thriving natural ecological balance on the public lands”?
  3. What steps has the agency taken to enhance the safety of these roundups?
  4. What steps have been taken to enhance the likelihood of adoption or sale of wild horses?
  5. Can the Forest Service certify that no horses that are sold will be transferred to third-party buyers who may end up slaughtering the animals for commercial use?
  6. What are the funding needs to ensure that AMLs can be met in the future so the Forest Service doesn’t need to resort to roundups of this nature?

Thank you in advance for looking into this. I look forward to hearing from you.

Sincerely,

Dianne Feinstein
United States Senator

###

Source: Press Release (feinstein.senate.gov/) »


What say you dear readers? Too little, too late? Who believes it isn’t going to matter who speaks out, these are dead horses? That seems to be the goal, and tragically not a new one. Sale or no sale. —Editor


Related Reading

California wild horse round up means some may go to slaughter, Oct. 9, 2018, Tuesday’s Horse »

California wild horse round up means some may go to slaughter

California wild horses. By Wide Open Country.
California wild horses. By Wide Open Country.

CNN (Oct 8, 2018) — On Wednesday, officials will begin rounding up 1,000 wild horses from federal land in Northern California and putting them up for sale and adoption.

Pregnant and younger horses will likely be adopted, federal officials say, but older horses will be sent to another corral where they could be sold for as little as $1 each to ranchers, horse trainers and other buyers — including those who might ship them to slaughterhouses.

Why are these horses being rounded up?

The horses live on Devil’s Garden Plateau, a protected territory inside Modoc National Forest near the Oregon border. It’s home to the largest herd of wild horses in the country managed by the US Forest Service.

Last month, federal officials said they’ve exceeded their limit for how many horses the area can hold.

“Our territory is supposed to have 206 to 402 animals, we have almost 4,000 horses,” Modoc National Forest Supervisor Amanda McAdams said in a statement.

The plateau is 258,000 acres, but McAdams said there’s not nearly enough vegetation and water to support all the horses.

The horses have been feeding on limited foliage and drinking up most of the water supply, leaving little behind for other wild animals.

“Reducing the population will allow range and riparian ecological conditions to recover, while also supporting herd health by reducing competition for limited food, water and habitat,” the Forest Service said in a press release.

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Updated 6:46 PM ET, Mon October 8, 2018. Read full report »

By Christina Maxouris and Brandon Griggs, CNN.

Disneyland opens new Circle D Ranch for its horses in Norco

The crew at Disneyland’s Circle D Ranch facility in Norco, post for a photo with two of the horses that stay there. Posing with the crew are Mickey Mouse, along with Mary Niven, vice president of the Disneyland Resort (in a light blue coat) and to the right of Mickey is Mikey Trujillo, Disneyland Ambassador. (Photo by Mark Eades, Orange County Register/SCNG)
The crew at Disneyland’s Circle D Ranch facility in Norco, post for a photo with two of the horses that stay there. Posing with the crew are Mickey Mouse, along with Mary Niven, vice president of the Disneyland Resort (in a light blue coat) and to the right of Mickey is Mikey Trujillo, Disneyland Ambassador. (Photo by Mark Eades, Orange County Register/SCNG)

CALIFORNIA (June 10, 2017 — Disneyland’s horses have a new place to roam as stables for the theme park’s equine population officially opened in Norco.

Called the Circle D Ranch, it takes the place of the previous Circle D Ranch that was located backstage at Disneyland. That old site is now under construction as part of the “Star Wars” land project scheduled to open up at the theme park in 2019.

“We looked for two years to find a place for our horses, and this location was the perfect fit,” said Mikey Trujillo, a Disneyland Ambassador speaking at the ribbon-cutting ceremony held Saturday, June 10, at the ranch.

One of the large horses at the Circle D Ranch in Norco, checks out all the visitors to the ranch on Saturday, June 10, during an open house at the Disneyland Resort owned facility. The ranch is now the home for the horses used at the Disneyland Resort to pull the Horse-Drawn Streetcars on Main Street U.S.A. and for other special events. (Photo by Mark Eades, Orange County Register/SCNG)
One of the large horses at the Circle D Ranch in Norco, checks out all the visitors to the ranch on Saturday, June 10, during an open house at the Disneyland Resort owned facility. The ranch is now the home for the horses used at the Disneyland Resort to pull the Horse-Drawn Streetcars on Main Street U.S.A. and for other special events. (Photo by Mark Eades, Orange County Register/SCNG)

Among the types of horses staying at the ranch are Percherons, Belgians, Brabants, Shires and Clydesdales, with one weighing in at nearly 2,000 pounds.   Continue reading »

Norco is a city in Riverside County, California, in the United States. According to city ordinances, the architecture of Norco “shall reflect a desired Western theme,” including qualities “described as rural, informal, traditional, rustic, low-profile and equestrian oriented.”

Horse Fund logo by © Vivian Grant Farrell.

Tuesday’s Horse is the Official Blog of The Horse Fund

Former racehorses rescued from slaughter

Update 5/17/2017 8:17 a.m EST. Since Shedrow Confessions seems to have a handle on the backstory to this report, we will refer you to them and close our investigation. Go to shedrowconfessions.com for their story. Warning: Foul Language.


SAN DIEGO, Calif. (Source) — A San Diego County horse rescue is saving 20 thoroughbred racehorses from being slaughtered for meat, which is sold on the black market for human consumption in other parts of the world.

Michelle Cochran runs HiCaliber Horse Rescue in Valley Center.

“I have been in the horse world for over a decade and I haven’t known it existed,” Cochran said.

She wants to raise awareness on illegal horse meat trade.

“It’s human consumption. That’s the biggest issue,” Cochran said. “It’s all for human consumption.”

Cochran said in some parts of Europe, Russia and Asia, people eat horse meat. Some of the horses who end up in the “kill pens” are former racehorses.

It’s a fact that can be traced back to the tattoos that race horses have inside their upper lip.

When Cochran learned of 20 thoroughbred racehorses about to be slaughtered for meat in Louisiana, she and the group jumped into action – raising $40,000 in 48 hours.

“If they get hurt. They are too slow. They are too old. They are done,” Cochran said. Continue reading »

Take Action to End Horse Slaughter

Write or call your U.S. Representative and ask them to co-sponsor and use their influence to pass the SAFE ActH.R. 113 — that bans horse slaughter and closes the export to slaughter loophole for all horses including racehorses.

Story Source: Channel 10 News, San Diego.