Horse Race Insider’s Note to Racing: No More Mixed Messages

We note a few quotes and write in response to a Horse Race Insider’s article, “Note to Racing: No More Mixed Messages.”

Quote: “Aside from seeing an occasional news broadcast, the public has little to no interest in the game.”

We Say: Because horse racing has little to no interest in the public. This is an insider’s game. Plus — and this may ultimately be the defining factor particularly in the current climate — the public do not want to watch racehorses being killed.

Quote: “None of the people that have signed on to support the HIA [Horseracing Integrity Act] race their stock without drugs, even though they openly oppose it. They do not want to lose the edge from supposedly non performance-enhancing medications. That in itself negates the claim that drugs regularly administered to racehorses are benign.”

We Say: Yes. Correct.

Quote: “It is easy to look good backing a bill with no chance of becoming law.”

We Say: Spot on.

QUOTE: “TJC’s [The Jockey Club] support of DOA [dead on arrival] HIA bill, and not the Racehorse Doping Ban Act of 2019, aka Udall-Wyden, or the Safeguard American Food Exports (SAFE) Act 2019, makes it seem as if the stewards of racing are moving forward to improve the reputation and integrity of the sport, but not supporting Udall-Wyden and SAFE clearly shows it is a publicity ploy.

“HIA not only lacks the necessary support, it faces the opposition of the National Horseman’s Benevolent and Protective Association and Kentucky’s Senator Mitch McConnell, who acts on the wishes of Churchill Downs, and has no mechanism to fund itself.

“Supporting a bill that has no chance to become law is the perfect ploy to placate the public and the perceived enemy, animal rights groups.

“HIA not only places the same ineffectual industry leaders in a majority position on a board with government backing, it sets up the United States Anti-Doping Authority for a fall.

“Udall-Wyden and SAFE, which would both be beneficial to the sport are absent of TJC support. SAFE in particular because it outlaws horse slaughter in the US and prohibits the export of horses for slaughter in other countries.”

We Say: Exactly.

Here is where we part company with the Horse Race Insider article.

QUOTE: “Chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) causes death by blows to the head, yet the National Football League and the National Hockey league are not even remotely worried that society or politicians will banish Football or Ice Hockey.

“Thoroughbred horse racing’s leaders need to wake up to the fact that the industry isn’t an endangered species and get back to competing with sports betting, which is likely to have a much greater negative effect in the industry than horse deaths.

“In one year, the narrative has changed from how to grow the sport to how to save it. The issues of growth have not changed, nor has the chance horse racing will be banished.

“The time has come to take the reins and drive the sport into the future, not shrink from the actions of animal rights activists.”

We Say: The quote in the article that breaks the bank is this, “Thoroughbred horseracing’s leaders need to wake up to the fact that the industry isn’t an endangered species and get back to competing with sports betting, which is likely to have a much greater negative effect in the industry than horse deaths.” More than horse deaths? How do you think horse racing got into its current jam then?

As regards the horses, racehorses aren’t recruited. They don’t sign multi million contracts to train and compete. Neither do they volunteer their services. They are purposely bred, created, not for themselves — but to be hideously used and disposed of by a cruel industry whose concern for their welfare has become virtually non existent. 

Please folks whatever you do, do not try to respond with comments about how much owners and trainers “love” their horses. If so, then their love is the kiss of death. Added to that, they wouldn’t be in this business at all if they gave a flying you know what about the racehorse.

As a sidenote, we are not picking on Horse Race Insider here. We are simply using its article as an example of how a majority, if not all, of horse racing thinks.

As you can see, many in horse racing are still making piously bankrupt remarks about reform, and turning around and contradicting themselves just a few days later. It’s bedlam trying to follow it all. Horse Race Insider just happened to gift us with what we needed all in one place, that’s all.

What it appears in actuality is all that American horse racing truly wants is for the bad publicity, outside interference, proposed federal oversight, anti-doping legislation, suggestions of an independent Commissioner — and oh, yes, those annoying day-to-day racetrack death watches and protests — to go far, far away so they can go back to what they do undisturbed and unperturbed. Who can blame them — if you are of that ilk.

However, that means the continued drugging, abuse and killing of racehorses. Why would anyone who enjoys a flutter want to gamble on such a thing? How can the rest of us turn a blind eye?
_______

Read full article here »

Horse racing kills in Australia

Jockey tries to hold an Australian steady up who has a badly fractured foreleg.

From the Australian “Death Watch” report at the Horse Racing Kills website:

Caslon Quote Left BlackFor a one year period from 1 August 2017 to 31 July 2018, the Coalition for the Protection of Racehorses has collected data from the stewards reports from every state and territory in Australia, compiling a detailed report of the horses who have died in racing and the reasons why – something that is not made available to the public each year by the industry itself.”

The 12 month period of data collection ends on the Horse’s Birthday (August 1) and is released on the first day of Spring (September 1). This is also known as the racing year in Australia.

Their report shows that the total kills for the one year period was 119, or one dead racehorse every three days. 46 of the 119 were 2 yr olds.

It is our view that 2 year olds should not be raced, with good reason. Read on.

by JANE ALLIN

Racing Babies: Are Two-Year Olds Too Young?

Part 1:  Introduction
Part 2:  Stages of Bone Growth in the Horse
Part 3:  Effects of Training and Racing on the Immature Musculoskeletal System
Part 4:  What Racing People Say: Fact or Fiction?
Part 5:  The Verdict: Training Regiments – Too Much, Too Soon?

In the Introduction Allin writes:

Caslon Quote Left BlackMore than a sport, horse racing is a huge business where moneyed gentry spend their fortunes during yearling sales with the expectation that these horses begin to earn their keep at the tender age of two. It is indeed an unyielding situation in which horses are valued largely for the first three years of their life and wherein their bona fide value is ultimately established.

“Above all the investor’s main objective is to race 2-year olds in preparation for the celebrated 3-year old stakes races after which these adolescent horses will be retired to the breeding shed. It is well recognized that the modern Thoroughbred’s peak earning potential occurs at the age of three with, on average, diminishing return at the age of four and beyond.”

“The current owners want two-year-old racing and I think it’s a pity. I think it’s a pity because it certainly does cause the breakdown of a lot of two year olds.” — Percy Sykes, horse racing industry vet.

An Australian study on the rates of injuries that occur during the training and racing of 2-year olds revealed that 85% suffered at least one incident of injury or disease. See “Racing Babies”, Part 3 by Jane Allin.

• See all our Special Reports, especially those by Jane Allin, on The Horse Fund website »

Del Mar starts its summer meet with two kills

ESPN and numerous other news outlets reported two deaths at California’s Del Mar racecourse which just opened its Summer Season of racing on July 17.

ESPN wrote:

Caslon Quote Left Black“Two horses suffered fatal injuries Thursday morning after colliding in an accident during training hours at Del Mar racetrack in California, a spokesman for the track confirmed on Thursday.

“The accident occurred around 6:30 a.m. P.T. when Charge a Bunch, an unraced 2-year-old colt trained by Carla Gaines, threw rider Giovanni Franco and ran the wrong way down the track.

“Charge a Bunch then collided with Carson Valley, an unraced 3-year-old gelding trained by Bob Baffert who was working in the opposite direction.


Bob Baffert who is reportedly worth $10 Million. That's a lot of blood money.
Trainer Bob Baffert, responsible for racehorse Carson Valley, is reportedly worth $10 Million reports an article published by COED.

“Del Mar told ESPN earlier Thursday that the horses were euthanized shortly after the accident but later clarified that the horses were killed in the collision.”

Let’s get our facts straight.

NBC Palm Springs reports:

Caslon Quote Left Black“From the clinical examination of the horses it appears both suffered cervical fractures and both were dead on the racetrack,” said Dr. Rick Arthur, a veterinary with the California Racing Board.


What we know for sure is that they are dead — and by all appearances the deaths were “accidental”, or in other words they didn’t “break down (as in a leg) and die”, as racehorses typically do these days as a matter of routine. This time the horses broke their necks.

How about this quote by Kathy Guillermo in a statement made by PeTA following the announcement of the death of these horses:

“Saying that deaths are inevitable in racing is like saying a swim team can’t compete without drowning.”

Normally the public would have heard nothing about these deaths. Most tracks don’t even report or record training kills. However, all eyes are on California horse racing following Santa Anita’s recent disastrous season of kills.

What’s not mentioned is the pain and mental suffering these two young horses endured as they died. Yes, mental suffering. These are sentient beings.

Source ESPN article by Katherine Terrell, “Two horses die at Del Mar after colliding” »

Related Reading Rancho Santa Fe Review; July 5, 2019; “Del Mar strengthens safety standards after Santa Anita deaths” »

Baffert Picture COED article by Josh Sanchez; May 4, 2019; “Bob Baffert Net Worth 2019: How Much is Horse Trainer Worth Today?” »

 

Horse Racing Wrongs: Last week’s broken, bleeding and dead

Barbaro after he suffered the fatal breaks that eventually claimed his life. The carnage and suffering continues throughout thoroughbred and quarter horse racing. Image Source: Bryant Photos.
Barbaro after he suffered the fatal breaks that eventually claimed his life. The carnage and suffering continues throughout thoroughbred and quarter horse racing. Image Source: Bryant Photos.

Patrick Buttello reports and protests the mayhem and deaths associated with U.S. horse racing on a continual basis. Here is a sample of his work. Lest we forget. There is much more on his website.

Last week in U.S. Thoroughbred and QuarterHorse Racing (Equibase)

Compiled by Patrick Buttello at HorseRacingWrongs »

You Know Too “was pulled up in distress…vanned off” at Delaware
Blame Logan “vanned off” at Louisiana
Obscene Britches “took a bad step” at Mountaineer – subsequently confirmed dead
Miss Q Who “vanned off” at Zia
Afleet Destiny “fell, DNF” at Parx
No Sham Here “vanned off” at Zia
Super Mama “bled” at Belmont
Benny Special “vanned home” at Indiana
Cheray “vanned home” at Indiana
Kieran Street “fell, DNF” at Finger Lakes – subsequently confirmed dead
Swiss Alps “vanned off” at Gulfstream
Avro “vanned off in severe distress” at Belterra
Coach’s Dream “vanned off” at Churchill
Meadow Storm “vanned off” at Penn
Scottsgold “vanned off” at Penn
Tollie Rossel “bled during the race” at Prairie
Ta Ta Nomoro “fell suddenly, van off” at Remington
Windy Cape “in distress, vanned off” at Belterra – subsequently confirmed dead
Martha Rose “in distress, vanned off” at Belterra – subsequently confirmed dead
Category Two “pulled up in distress…euthanized” at Charles Town
Jess Doit “vanned off” at Los Alamitos
Linnaeus “bled from the nostrils and mouth” at Remington
Appoggiatura “fell over the last fence” at Shawan
Moss Code “collided with fallen horse [above] and brought down” at Shawan
Dee Favorite Girl “bled, vanned off” at Zia
Approximator “vanned off” at Belterra
Fly B “vanned off” at Los Alamitos
Jess Wong “vanned off” at Los Alamitos
Abets Abet “returned bleeding from both nostrils” at Parx
Jessaspecial “bled” at Prairie

#  #  #

DNF=Did Not Finish (complete the race)

Locomotives sitting atop toothpicks

We leave you with this quote.

THOROUGHBRED RACEHORSES

“Our horses are sick. Our thoroughbreds are thoroughly inbred. They are locomotives sitting atop toothpicks. They are fragile and friable, designed to run but not to recover from running. And each time they break down or wear out, we chalk it up to an individual horse’s shortcomings, rather than the decades-long decline of the entire breeding industry”.

— Barry Petchesky (Deadspin)

Quote from “Our Racehorses are Broken America »

Read more at Horse Fund’s Horse Racing Reports »

Please Share

Please tag and share, retweet, gram etc. Thank you!