FOIA document obtained by WHFF shows wild horses betrayed by RTF, ASPCA & HSUS

Desatoya Wild Horses in short term holding after being rounded up by the BLM.

The Wild Horse Freedom Federation (WHFF) has obtained an alarming report through the Freedom of Information Act clearly showing that “Neda DeMayo of Return to Freedom, Nancy Perry of ASPCA, Gillian Lyons of HSUS and Drew Lesofski of the American Mustang Foundation participated in a closed door, round table meeting with pro-slaughter groups.”

Jason Lutterman, a BLM public relations employee, stated in an attached email that the aforementioned advocacy groups agreed to “the need to reduce overpopulation and achieve appropriate management level quickly through gathers,” and “the advocates also expressed desire for BLM to follow gathers with intensive fertility control…”

You probably recognize the names except for Jason Lutterman. Lutterman states on his LinkdIn page that he is a Public Affairs Specialists for the Bureau of Land Management since July 2014. He has been one of the BLM’s most active campaigners for spaying and neutering Mustangs.

Here is an image of the cited email.

There is much more to this story. Read it all at the Wild Horse Freedom Federation website »


CREDIT

Featured image: Desatoya Wild Horses in short term holding after being rounded up by the BLM. Photographer Unknown.

Little of federal budget spent on wild horse fertility

Cross-posted from Seattle PI
By SCOTT SONNER, Associated Press

Nevada quarter shows free roaming wild horses.
The Nevada quarter features three wild horses roaming freely. Three is about all that may be left. It looks like the feds and their State comrades are still committed to spending your taxpayer dollars on a wipe out campaign. -Ed.

RENO, Nev. (AP) — The government spent less than 1 percent of its wild horse management budget on contraception programs and more than 60 percent on horse holding facilities last fiscal year despite a pledge to step up use of fertility control as an alternative to controversial roundups of overpopulated mustang herds on U.S. rangelands, agency records show.

Wild horse advocates say the fiscal year 2013 budget numbers show the U.S. Bureau of Land Management has reneged on a commitment to fertility control as the best way moving forward to keep herd numbers in check when necessary in Nevada and nine other Western states.

Instead, the leader of the largest national coalition says she fears the administration is moving to align itself with a growing number of ranching interests urging an end to the ban on slaughter of horses at overflowing holding pens where costs are skyrocketing.

“The only explanation at this point is that the BLM is creating a crisis where slaughter of America’s wild horses is the only solution,” said Suzanne Roy, executive director of the American Wild Horse Preservation Campaign. She said the 509 mares that received fertility treatment last year were far short of the annual goal of 2,000 the agency set three years ago.

BLM spokesman Tom Gorey said Wednesday the critics’ claims are baseless, “anti-BLM propaganda.”

In a 451-page report highly critical of the BLM last June, an independent panel of the National Academy of Sciences said the agency should invest in widespread fertility control of the mustangs instead of spending millions to house them. It concluded the BLM’s removal of nearly 100,000 horses from the Western range over the past decade is probably having the opposite effect of its intention to ease ecological damage and reduce overpopulated herds. Read full report >>

BLM concludes Pancake emergency wild horse gather

Pancake Mustang Receives Freeze Brand re PZP.

Pancake Mustang Receives Freeze Brand re PZP.
BLM NEVADA PHOTO
A wild horse specialist applies a freeze-brand to the horse’s neck indicating that the mare has received the fertility control drug PZP.

BLM PRESS RELEASE

The Bureau of Land Management (BLM) Ely District, Egan Field Office concluded the Pancake Herd Management Area (HMA) Emergency Wild Horse Gather on Thursday, Sept. 13. The BLM gathered and removed 124 wild horses from the southern end of the HMA in south-central Nevada, about 30 miles west of Ely or 80 miles northeast of Tonopah, Nev. The animals were at-risk of death if they remained on the range because of minimal forage growth and reduced water availability due to severe drought conditions.

The horses were transported to the Palomino Valley Center outside Reno, Nev., to be prepared for the BLM’s adoption program. Un-adopted wild horses will be placed in long-term pastures where they will be humanely cared for and retain their “wild” status and protection under the 1971 Wild Free-Roaming Horses and Burros Act. The BLM does not sell or send any wild horses to slaughter.

The emergency gather began on September 12. An Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) veterinarian was on site daily through the gather to evaluate animal conditions and provide recommendations to the on-site BLM wild horse and burro specialist for care and treatment. BLM staff utilized the Henneke body condition scale to classify gathered wild horses. On a scale from one to nine (one being poor condition and nine being extremely fat), the horses were generally a body condition score of two and three, with a few wild horses observed to be higher or lower.

The BLM’s Pancake HMA Emergency Wild Horse Gather website can be accessed at this address: http://www.blm.gov/nv/st/en/fo/ely_field_office/blm_programs/wild_horses_and_burros/pancake_hma_wild_horse.html

For more information, contact Chris Hanefeld, BLM Ely District public affairs specialist, at (775) 289-1842 or by email at chanefel@blm.gov.

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Will someone explain to me if these roundups are so necessary and the program so successful, why are there 15,000 to 18,000 wild horses left on public lands and a reported 75,000 in long-term holding.

The only success we see is the decimation of our wild horse and burro herds. There was a day when there were millions of wild horses on America’s public lands who survived wonderfully well without human interference.

Emergency indeed? What about the cattle? There seems to be plenty of forage and water for them on the public lands set aside for our wild horses and burros. Eat a burger, kill a mustang. –Ed.