Support H.R.961 now

MARCH AGAINST HORSE SLAUGHTER — Calling all Americans! We end March with one last plea to ask your U.S. Representative to cosponsor H.R. 961 to help us reach 290 cosponsors which will release the bill from its Committee assignments and get it onto the U.S. House floor for a vote. H.R.961 currently has 228 cosponsors.

We hear from some of you that you feel it is not appropriate right now to be “bothering Congress”. Mrs Farrell responded to this in the comment section of a post.

Some people have said they don’t want to bother their Representatives while the virus scare is going on and Congress is so busy. That’s honorable and considerate. BUT you can contact them via email or with PopVox and your request and comments will be directed to the Aide responsible for this bill (H.R.961). Each Aide then makes a report at the end of the month of how many calls, emails etc they have gotten on a bill, for or against, how strongly they feel about it, and reports it to the “boss” who then decides whether or not to cosponsor it. So please take action. It will only take you 10-15 minutes. Thank you. For the Horses!

Make a Call

Phone calls are tallied weekly. Know who your Representative is? Use the Capitol Switchboard at (202) 224-3121 and they will put you through. When your reach their office, remember to ask for the Aide handling H.R.961, the SAFE Act. Have your talking points ready. Type them up beforehand and read them. They probably won’t notice, but if they do they will be grateful you prepared yourself so well before you called.

Be sure to leave your name, address and phone number (you may also be asked for your email) and ask them to read it back to you for accuracy before you hang up. This is standard. They will not mind!

Contact your US Representative today online or by phone. Ask them to Cosponsor H.R.961.

Do It Online

You can take action online any time of the day or night.

HOUSE.gov

Find Your Representative (using your zip code)

Directory of Representatives

Contact Your Representative

POPVOX.com

Create a free PopVox Account (with email & password)

Horse Fund Stakeholders Page

Talking Points

Here are some ideas to get you started:

H.R. 961 (the SAFE Act) — To prevent human health threats posed by the consumption of equines raised in the United States.

Tens of thousands of American horses are shipped each year to Canada and Mexico to be slaughtered for human consumption — a practice that 80% of American voters oppose.

American horses are not raised for food and routinely given a wide range of medications that are expressly prohibited for use in meat products for particularly for human consumption.

Phenylbutazone (commonly known as “bute”) is a painkiller used legally by more than 85% of US horse owners to treat everyday soreness and inflammation, is banned completely in food-producing animals.

Even so, the problem of horses and burros being butchered for human consumption persists because “kill-buyers” can legally purchase horses at auctions or from unsuspecting owners in order to transport them to slaughterhouses across US borders.

Horse slaughter being a predatory business, various regulatory agency ID documentation systems for slaughterbound horses, including “passports” showing a horse’s origin and medical history, have all miserably failed.

The problem of hundreds of thousands of American horses being shipped to slaughter across our borders has persisted for far too long and despite overwhelming public opposition to this practice.

The negative food safety and animal welfare concerns associated with the horse slaughter industry are simply too great to continue to ignore.

The US has a moral obligation to outlaw the slaughter of horses for human consumption and prevent unsafe horse meat from entering the human food chain.

Support the SAFE Act of 2019 by cosponsoring and voting for H.R.961.

Republican Support

Please see our call to action post on getting more Republican support. Anti horse slaughter bills have traditionally received bipartisan support. If they have cosponsored a similar bill in the past and not this time, it is mostly likely because they have not heard from enough of you. Remember, they are getting calls from those who oppose the bill too!

Horse meat cuts painted on a live, grazing horse.
Horse with Types of Meat Painted On.

Something to Consider

We know that some of you are thinking it is too late to get this bill through. So long as Congress is in session, it is not too late. Time, however, is of the essence. We need to get this done before the Summer Recess even if they shorten it or do not take it at all.

In the meantime, consider this.

H.R.961 is called the SAFE Act which stands for the Safeguard American Food Exports Act of 2019. It is called that for a reason. Horses are given a long list of drugs throughout their lifetimes that bar their meat from entering the human food chain.

We need every single individual who cares about horses and food safety to take action on this bill. Surely everyone can see, with what we are going through right now, how urgent food safety is.

It is immoral of us as a nation to continue to ship toxic horse meat around the world knowing it is for human consumption. Would you have the U.S. behave as China?

Thank You

Thank you for taking action.


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March against horse slaughter 2020 finale

Horses are shipped to Korea to be slaughtered.

March Against Horse Slaughter 2020 ends tomorrow March 31.

When we planned our March campaign against horse slaughter, we did not know that the nation and the world would be in crisis. We know it has been a scary and distracting time for so many and your thoughts and concerns have been elsewhere.

Thank you to everyone who have read, “liked”, commented and shared our March Against Horse Slaughter 2020 posts.

A huge thank you to Jane Allin who has so diligently provided us yet again with her peerless reports.

New Campaign

The numbers and information Jane Allin provided us during March Against Horse Slaughter 2020 have helped us at the Fund for Horses tremendously in planning where to the launch its new innovative campaign against horse slaughter and horse meat consumption.

It is a unique and inspired international campaign and we are very excited about it. We were going to begin on the final day of March, but of course the timing is anything but advantageous. So, it is back to the drawing board regarding a date and time. We are putting our collective heads together to determine when the most optimum time will be. Stay tuned! In the meantime, we would love to have your input too.

Final day

We will have an Action Alert on our final day, so please check back with us tomorrow, March 31st.

All reports

In the meantime, here are links to all of Jane Allin’s horse slaughter and horse meat production reports.

Horse slaughter and horse meat production worldwide — Introduction »

Horse slaughter and horse meat production — A global perspective »

Top 10 countries ranked by horses slaughtered and horse meat production — 2018 »

Top 10 importers and exporters of horse meat worldwide »

All posts

Here is a link to everything we posted during this year’s March Against Horse Slaughter campaign »

Stay safe and be well.


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Canada’s horse slaughter plants and US ports of entry

Truck full of slaugherbound horses. Image via Glogster.com.

By JANE ALLIN

MARCH AGAINST HORSE SLAUGHTER

Horse Slaughter Plants — Canada

Three slaughterhouses are federally licensed to slaughter horses in Canada:

(1) Viande Richelieu Inc. in Massueville, Que.; Reg No 076; 
https://www.vianderichelieu.com/ 

(2) Les Viandes de la Petite-Nation in St-Andre- Avellin, Que.; [517 Rang Sainte Julie E, Saint-André-Avellin, QC J0V 1W0]; Reg No 505; (no website)

(3) Bouvry Export Calgary Ltd. in Fort MacLeod, Alta.; Reg No 506;
https://www.bouvrycanada.ca/ 

Canada — US Ports of Entry

Here are the only designated ports of entry for slaughter-bound horses:

Canadian Food Inspection Agency Port of Entry:Corresponding US Port of Entry
Kingsgate, British Columbia
250-417-2293
Eastport, Idaho
208-267-2396
Coutts, Alberta
403-344-3808
Sweetgrass, Montana
406-335-9610
North Portal, Saskatchewan
306-927-2255
Portal, North Dakota
701-926-4281
Sarnia (Point Edward), Ontario
519-332-3031
Port Huron, Michigan
517-324-5298
Windsor, Ontario
519-969-2522
Detroit, Michigan
313-226-4428
Niagara Falls (Queenston), Ontario
905-937-7434
Lewiston, New York
716-297-6203
Saint-Bernard-de-Lacolle, Quebec
450-246-4125
Champlain, New York
518-298-2191
Woodstock, New Brunswick
506-325-1960
Houlton, Maine
207-532-6099
Source: https://www.inspection.gc.ca/animal-health/humane-transport/horses/designated-border-ports/eng/1324090361423/1324310392596

Updated Apr. 2, 2020 — Canadian Premium Meats Inc. in Lacombe, Alta. is no longer in operation.

Featured Image: Glogster.com.


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Top 10 importers and exporters of horse meat worldwide

A horse in slaughter buyer Mike McCarron's trailer in Cleburne, Texas, August, 2019. USA Today.

By Jane Allin

MARCH AGAINST HORSE SLAUGHTER — Recall from the previous articles in this series, that the FAO stats are not always based on original datasets for countries included in their assessments. The FAO Statistics Division addressed this by developing innovative methods to improve data reliability and consistency across statistical domains.

As a result, the numbers quoted in the last two articles did not always reflect those seen elsewhere, however they provided a framework and a general guideline for the overall distribution of horse meat production and horse slaughter across the globe. 

By contrast, the FAO numbers obtained for the top ten importers and exports of horse meat, apart from China (aggregate numbers based on imputation methods), are the official data from each country and so provide a more accurate picture of the global distribution of imports and exports.

Moreover, the most recent data for these numbers are from 2017, as opposed to 2018 for the horse slaughter and horse meat production.

The data collected will consider the following:

  • The top 10 horse meat importers in both quantity (tonnes) and value (1000s of USD) in 2017. Note that the most recent data for these numbers are from 2017, as opposed to 2018 for the horse slaughter and horse meat production
  • A comparison of the top ten horse meat importers (quantity and value) between 2017 and 2013 – a 4-year span.  This is to compare what we looked at in 2015 where the most recent data at that time was from 2013.
  • The top 10 horse meat exporters in both quantity (tonnes) and value (1000s of USD) in 2017.
  • A comparison of the top ten horse meat exporters (quantity and value) between 2017 and 2013 – a 4-year span.  

Top 10 Horse Meat Importers (Quantity in Tonnes)

The top 10 horse meat importing countries in quantity (tonnes) globally (2017) were responsible for about 94% of the world’s total as shown in Table 1 and Figure 1.

This represents 109,254 tonnes or roughly 241 million pounds. China (~20%) and Italy (~19%) were the two highest importers of horse meat.

Table 1.  Horse meat imports (tonnes) and percent of total globally — 2019

Figure 1.  Horse meat imports (tonnes) and percent of total globally — 2017

Changes in Horse Meat Imports from 2013 to 2019 — Top 10 Importing Countries (quantity)

From 2013 to 2017 there was a 7.1% increase in the quantity of horse meat imported for the top 10 importing countries in the world. This amounts to a total of 7,238 tonnes or ~ 16 million lb.

The most notable increase in horse meat imports was observed for China with an incredibly large increase of over 1300% or about 48 million pounds of imported horse meat. Voracious appetites indeed. Imports from the Netherlands’ also reported a large increase of about 170% or about 18 million lb.  Of note is that in 2013 China ranked 12th in the world but moved up to the number 1 spot in 2017. 

Apart from Japan (~23% or ~2 million lb.) and Bulgaria (~14% or ~ 600,000 lb.), which also had increased imports, imports in all other countries, each of which were ranked in the top 10 in 2013, decreased. The largest decreases were observed for Belgium (~ 38% or ~20 million lb.) and Switzerland (~34% or ~ 3 million lb.). 

Overall 4, countries (China, The Netherlands, Japan and Bulgaria) increased imports of horse meat by about 69 million lb. and the remaining 6 decreased imports by about 53 million lb. for a net increase of about 16 million lb. (actual = 7,238 tonnes = 15,959,790).

This is shown in Table 2 and Figure 2.

Table 2. Horse meat imports (tonnes) — comparison of 2013 and 2017

Figure 2. Horse meat imports (tonnes) — comparison of 2013 and 2017

Top 10 Horse Meat Importers (Value in 1000’s of USD)

The top 10 horse meat importing countries in value (1000’s of USD) globally (2017) are responsible for about 95% of the world’s total horse meat value as shown in Table 3 and Figure 3.

This represents 427,612 in 1000’s of USD or roughly 428 million USD. Italy’s import value of about 100 million USD (~22%) is by far the largest of the global total.

Table 3. Horse meat imports (1000’s of USD) and percent of total globally – 2017

Figure 3. Horse meat imports (1000’s of USD) and percent of total globally — 2017

Changes in Horse Meat Imports from 2013 to 2019 – Top 10 Importing Countries (Value)

From 2013 to 2017 there was a 10.3% decrease in the value (1000’s of USD) of horse meat imported for the top 10 importing countries in the world. This amounts to a total of about 39 million USD.

Italy, Belgium and France remained the 3 top countries for the value of horse meat imported, despite all 3 having reduced values in 2017 compared to 2013.

The most notable, increase in the value of horse meat imported to a country was observed for China with a large increase of about 182% or about 47 million USD worth of imported horse meat. The only other countries showing an increase in the value of imported horse meat were the Netherlands (~14%) and Japan (~3%). Of note is that in 2013 China ranked 13th in the world but moved up to the number 5 spot in 2017. 

The value of horse meat imports for all other countries, each of which were ranked in the top 10 in 2013, decreased. The decreases ranged from a high of Kazakhstan (~6% or ~20 million USD) to a low of ~0.6% in Italy (~15 million USD)

Overall 3, countries (China, the Netherlands and Japan) increased the value of horse meat imports by about 85 million USD and the remaining 7 decreased imports by about 124 million USD for a net decrease of ~39 million USD.

This is shown in Table 4 and Figure 4.

Table 4. Horse meat imports (1000’s of USD) — comparison of 2013 and 2017

Figure 4. Horse meat imports (1000’s of USD) – comparison of 2013 and 2017

Top 10 Horse Meat Exporters (Quantity in Tonnes) — 2017

The top 10 horse meat exporting countries in quantity (tonnes) globally (2017) were responsible for about 81% of the world’s total as shown in Table 5 and Figure 5.

This represents 107,465 tonnes or roughly 237 million pounds. Mongolia (~20%) was the largest horse meat exporter followed by Argentina.

Table 5. Horse meat exports (tonnes) and percent of total globally — 2017

Figure 5. Horse meat exports (tonnes) and percent of total globally — 2017

Changes in Horse Meat Exports from 2013 to 2019 – Top 10 Exporting Countries (Quantity)

From 2013 to 2017 there was a 23.7% increase in the quantity of horse meat exported for the top 10 exporting countries in the world. This amounts to a total of 25,507 tonnes or ~ 56 million lb.

The most notable increase in horse meat exports was observed for Mongolia with an incredibly large increase of over 1200% or about 53 million pounds of imported horse meat. Interestingly, Kenya that had no exports in 2013, exported 6,560 tonnes (~14.5 million lb.) in 2017. 

Romania, Uruguay, Spain and Argentina also had increased exports; 74% (~7 million lb.), 33% (~3.4 million lb.), 25% (~3 million lb.) and 6% (~ 2 million lb.) respectively. Of note is that in 2013 Mongolia ranked 12th in the world but moved up to the number 1 spot in 2017, and Kenya ranked 8th after having no exports 4 years before. 

All other countries’ exports of horse meat decreased. The largest decrease was observed for Canada (~58% or ~25 million lb.), while decreases for Belgium, and Poland were: 33% (~14 million lb.), and 26% (~24 million lb.), respectively. 

The following should clear up any questions about the questionable FAO data observed for Canadian horse slaughter increases observed between 2013 and 2018 (see previous article): 

The 58% decrease in the exports from Canada is a clear indication of the quantifiable decrease in horse slaughter that has occurred there over the past few years. Previous data taken from the FAO (see previous article re: horse slaughter and meat production) suggested that slaughter had increased. The reason for this contradiction is the use of the imputation models that are based on past trends and statistics for the horse slaughter and horse meat production (i.e. it is not “always” reliable). The data for the export values is official data and is thus authentic information.

Overall 7, countries increased exports by about 95 million lb. of horse meat and the remaining 3 decreased exports by about 39 million lb. for a net increase of about 56 million lb. (actual = 25,507 tonnes = 56,242,935‬).

This is shown in Table 6 and Figure 6.

Table 6. Horse meat exports (tonnes) — comparison of 2013 and 2017

N/A* – cannot calculate percentage increase (∞)

Figure 6. Horse meat exports (tonnes) – comparison of 2013 and 2017

Top 10 Horse Meat Exporters (Value in 1000’s of USD) — 2017

The top 10 horse meat exporting countries in value (1000’s of USD) globally (2017) were responsible for about 84% of the world’s total horse meat value as shown in Table 7 and Figure 7.

This represents 382,317 in 1000’s of USD or roughly 382 million USD. Belgium’s export value of about 64 million USD (~14%) was the largest of the global total, followed closely by Argentina’s value of about 61 million USD (~13.1%).

Table 7. Horse meat exports (1000’s of USD) and percent of total globally — 2017

Figure 7. Horse meat exports (1000’s of USD) and percent of total globally — 2017

Changes in horse meat imports from 2013 to 2019 – Top 10 importing countries (value)

From 2013 to 2017 there was a small 1.9% increase in the value (1000’s of USD) of horse meat exported for the top 10 exporting countries in the world. This amounts to a total of about 7 million USD.

Belgium remained the top country for the value of horse meat exported, despite having reduced values in 2017 compared to 2013 by about 29%.

The most notable increase in the value of horse meat exported to a country was observed for Mongolia with an exceptionally large increase of about 12oo% or ~38 million USD worth of exported horse meat. Other significant increases were observed for the Netherlands (~78%), Romania (~48%), Spain (~45%) and Uruguay (~29%). Mongolia moved from 15th in rank (2013) to 3rd, while the other countries remained in the top ten with some changes in their position. 

The value of horse meat exports for all other countries decreased. The decreases ranged from a high in Canada (~47% or ~37 million USD) to a low of ~14% in Poland (~6 million USD)

Overall 6 countries increased the value of horse meat exports by about 82 million USD and the remaining 4 decreased exports by about 75 million USD for a net decrease of ~7 million USD (actual = 6,967 million USD).

This is shown in Table 8 and Figure 8. 

Table 8. Horse meat exports (1000’s of USD) – comparison of 2013 and 2017

Figure 8. Horse meat exports (1000’s of USD) — comparison of 2013 and 2017

Summary

Imports

  • The top 10 horse meat importing countries in quantity (tonnes) globally in 2017 were responsible for about 94% of the world’s total.
  • This represents 109,254 tonnes or roughly 241 million pounds. China (~20%) and Italy (~19%) were the two highest importers of horse meat.
  • From 2013 to 2017 there was a 7.1% increase in the quantity of horse meat imported for the top 10 importing countries in the world. This amounts to a total of 7,238 tonnes or ~ 16 million lb. 
  • The most notable increase in horse meat imports was observed for China with a very large increase of over 1300% or about 48 million pounds of imported horse meat. In 2013 China ranked 12th in the world but moved up to the number 1 spot in 2017. 
  • Overall 4, countries increased imports of horse meat by about 69 million lb. and the remaining 6 decreased imports by about 53 million lb. for a net increase of about 16 million lb. 
  • The top 10 horse meat importing countries in value (1000’s of USD) globally in 2017 were responsible for about 95% of the world’s total horse meat value. This represents 427,612 in 1000’s of USD or roughly 428 million USD. 
  • Italy’s import value of about 100 million USD (~22%) was by far the largest of the global total.

Exports

  • The top 10 horse meat exporting countries in quantity (tonnes) globally in 2017 were responsible for about 81% of the world’s total. This represents 107,465 tonnes or roughly 237 million pounds. 
  • Mongolia (~20%) was the largest horse meat exporter followed by Argentina.
  • From 2013 to 2017 there was a 23.7% increase in the quantity of horse meat exported for the top 10 exporting countries in the world. This amounts to a total of 25,507 tonnes or ~ 56 million lb.
  • The most notable increase in horse meat exports was observed for Mongolia with an incredibly large increase of over 1200% or about 53 million pounds of imported horse meat. Interestingly, Kenya that had no exports in 2013, exported 6,560 tonnes (~14.5 million lb.) in 2017. 
  • Overall 7, countries increased exports in 2017 by about 95 million lb. of horse meat and the remaining 3 decreased exports by about 39 million lb. for a net increase of about 56 million lb. 
  • Belgium remained the top country for the value of horse meat exported, despite having reduced values in 2017 compared to 2013 by about 29%.
  • The top 10 horse meat exporting countries in value (1000’s of USD) globally in 2017 were responsible for about 84% of the world’s total horse meat value. This represents 382,317 in 1000’s of USD or roughly 382 million USD. 
  • Belgium’s export value of about 64 million USD (~14%) was the largest of the global total, closely followed by Argentina’s value of about 61 million USD (~13.1%).
  • From 2013 to 2017 there was a small 1.9% increase in the value (1000’s of USD) of horse meat exported for the top 10 exporting countries in the world. 
  • The most significant increase in the value of horse meat exported to a country was observed for Mongolia with a very large increase of about 12oo% or ~38 million USD worth of exported horse meat.
  • Overall 6, countries increased the value of horse meat exports by about 82 million USD and the remaining 4 decreased exports by about 75 million USD for a net decrease of ~7 million USD.

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FEATURED IMAGE: A horse looks out worriedly from slaughter buyer Mike McCarron’s trailer in Cleburne, Texas, August, 2019. USA Today.

All Related Reports

Horse slaughter and horse meat production worldwide — Introduction »

Horse slaughter and horse meat production — A global perspective »

Top 10 countries ranked by horses slaughtered and horse meat production — 2018 »

Top 10 importers and exporters of horse meat worldwide »