Make Your Own Oat Milk

Homemade oat milk. Image: DHerbs.

Hey there gang. It’s Wednesday. I feel like I have a lot of week left to get through even if it’s only a couple of days more. Not sure what is going on with that.

Vegan Milk

Vegan milk, or non dairy milk. Hmmm. Tried it yet? Hooked on it or so-so about it?

I started out years ago with rice milk. A bit watery but there wasn’t much else about. I didn’t really drink or use it much. Then almond milk came on the scene and I fell in love. Not too long after that along came cashew milk which my whole family loves. The latest, trendiest milk is oat milk. There’s good reason.

Dairy alternatives can get a bit expensive. But, hey, you can make your own. Its cheaper, tastes great and easy to make. The only thing that takes time is soaking the nuts, and it’s not like you have to stand over them (sm!le).

Oat milk is our milk of choice at the moment. It’s delicious and inexpensive to make at home. We make our own all the time. It lasts about three days — well nothing lasts three days at our house — but that’s the average “shelf life” of homemade oat milk.

It couldn’t be easier to make. Here’s a popular YouTube video. It has annoying background music, so sorry about that.

Scroll past the video if you like. My recipe for oak milk is just after.

Check out the comments to the video if you have time. There’s some cool ideas there.

If you decided not watch the video right now, here’s how I do it. You will need something to strain the soaked oats with. I have a mesh bag for such things. My sister in law uses pantyhose (unused but rinsed anyway pantyhose)!

How to Make Oat Milk

  1. Soak a cup of oats in water for at least 30 minutes. After soaking, your oats will blend up better and strain out more easily. 30 minutes is the minimum. I soak them overnight.
  2. Strain your oats and add to an everyday, standard blender, and throw out the water you soaked them in.
  3. Add 3-4 cups of fresh water depending on how thick you want your oat milk to be.
  4. Blend until smooth. About 2 to 3 minutes.
  5. Sweeten it with a date or maple syrup to taste, or leave it unsweetened if you are going to cook with it.

As I mentioned it stays fresh in the fridge for about 3 to 4 days.

Love y’all!

(Updated to correct about 100 typos 5.47pm. Sorry. 😙)

You could win a copy of Missionville

Missionville, written by Alex Brown (pictured with racing plates). By Vivian Grant Farrell.
Missionville, written by Alex Brown (pictured with racing plates). By Vivian Grant Farrell.

JUNE 2019 RAFFLE

This June is raffle month. We are raising money to fight for a federal law prohibiting the slaughter of American horses on U.S. soil and across U.S. borders. We may never have a better chance than the bill pending right now.

MISSIONVILLE

We have 5 copies of Alex Brown’s Missionville for you to win.

The NTRA estimates that 7,500 to 10,000 Thoroughbred racehorses are sent to slaughter per year. These deaths are in addition to the number of horses who die at the track.

In Missionville you will learn how and why racehorses are sent to slaughter, and who takes them there.

To enter, make a donation of $5.00 and we will throw your name into the hat. Enter as many times as you wish. A $25.00 donation would give you 5 entries, and so forth.

REVIEW

Alex Brown, author of Greatness and Goodness: Barbaro and His Legacy, has written a book called Missionville which delves into the lives and activities of the people who work horses in the business of the American claiming race.

Missionville is a well crafted story with credibly drawn characters you can root for or against as Brown gives you an unvarnished look at the day-to-day rigors of training and racing horses at a small track and its resulting often tragic consequences for horses and humans alike.

Eclipse award winner Mike Jensen, journalist for the Philadelphia Inquirer, in his review of Missionville puts it this way:

“Alex Brown, a lifelong horseman, takes you on a journey few are capable of providing. He takes you to the underbelly of the sport. A terrific read”.

Missionville gives true to life insight into what happens to horses when their careers begin to take a downward spiral and tragically end up in the claiming race system.

DONATE $5.00 FOR A CHANCE TO WIN

Drawing will be held on June 30, 2019 at 6.00 pm EST.

RELATED READING

H.R.961 — The SAFE Act of 2019, Tuesday’s Horse »

Take Action Against Horse Slaughter, The Horse Fund »

Back in the blogging saddle again soon

Hello there. It has been a wild and crazy month. We have been so busy since the beginning of the year we have hardly had time to catch our breath let alone blog.

We even put Patsy our vegan bloggist on assignment so that’s why you haven’t heard anything from her. But she’s been saving up some goodies for you.

We have so much to share but we will not bombard you with it all at once. Just a bit at a time.

Hope you have had a good start to the year. Thank you for staying with us.

The Horse Fund Family

P.S. We aren’t on Instagram. Do you want us on Instagram? We’ll jump on it if you do. Let us know in comments or email us at horsefund@gmail.com.

Wishing you the very best for 2019

Horse by Bob Langrish with permission. Fireworks and Horse by Vivian Grant Farrell. Not to be printed or reproduced by request of the photographer.
Horse by Bob Langrish with permission. Fireworks and Horse artwork by Vivian Grant Farrell. Not to be printed or reproduced by request of the photographer.

Greetings!

We wish you the very best for the new year ahead and so grateful to you for staying with us and taking part.

Over the next week we will be posting a year in review on each of the core issues we confront regarding the safety and welfare of horses.

As always, we welcome your thoughts and ideas so please continue to share them with us.

Your help and support is extremely valuable to the horses we love.

Warm regards,

The Horse Fund and the Tuesday’s Horse blog.