Back in the blogging saddle again soon

Hello there. It has been a wild and crazy month. We have been so busy since the beginning of the year we have hardly had time to catch our breath let alone blog.

We even put Patsy our vegan bloggist on assignment so that’s why you haven’t heard anything from her. But she’s been saving up some goodies for you.

We have so much to share but we will not bombard you with it all at once. Just a bit at a time.

Hope you have had a good start to the year. Thank you for staying with us.

The Horse Fund Family

P.S. We aren’t on Instagram. Do you want us on Instagram? We’ll jump on it if you do. Let us know in comments or email us at horsefund@gmail.com.

Secret Santa time Christmas match

Christmas toy horse

Greetings horse lovers!

Secret Santa Time

Our Secret Santa for 2018 has been awesome and helping horses and us in all sorts of wonderful, magical ways.

He is now offering a matching gift opportunity to all of you! Double up on yuletide love for horses with us.

Make a Matching Gift Donation »

Make a $30 matching gift donation. Sign up to give $5 a month for 6 months. It cancels automatically.

Make It a Christmas Present

If you wish to make this a Christmas gift to someone special, on receipt of your donation, we will send you a printable gift announcement you can present in all sort of fun ways, such as rolling it up and tying ribbon around it to put under the tree or as a stock stuffer! Or you can opt for us to correspond with them directly.

More on our donation thank you page »

—  We are always available at horsefund@gmail.com »

This offer is good through midnight EST Christmas Day, December 25, 2018.

Help stop cruel transport of horses in double decker trucks

A horse bound for slaughter looks out in desperation from a transport truck. Photographer: Unknown.
A slaughter bound horse looks out in fear and desperation from a transport truck. Photographer: Unknown.

AWI (Animal Welfare Institute) Sept. 27, 2018 — The bipartisan Horse Transportation Safety Act (H.R. 4040)—led by Reps. Steve Cohen (D-TN) and Walter Jones (R-NC)—would prohibit the interstate transportation of horses in a motor vehicle containing two or more levels stacked on top of one another.

This measure would ensure that horses are not crammed in double-deck trailers—an inhumane practice that poses a safety risk not only to the horses inside, but also to others on the road.

Hauling horses in double-deck trailers is cruel to the horse because such vehicles fail to provide enough space for horses to stand in a natural position with head raised.

No horse should have to endure a long journey unable to stand upright and in a cramped position that can cause permanent injury. These trailers are also unsafe on the road—they have been involved in several horrific traffic accidents, resulting in severe injuries and the brutal deaths of many horses.

Illustration of a double decker truck used to transport cattle. You can see that they are not intended for horses. Source: AWI.
Illustration of a double decker truck used to transport cattle. You can see that they are not intended for horses. Source: AWI (Animal Welfare Institute).

The US Department of Agriculture itself recognizes the inhumane nature of transporting horses using double-deck trailers, noting that these vehicles “do not provide adequate headroom for equines” and that trailers with “two or more permanent levels” simply cannot “accommodate adult equines, especially tall equines.”

Take Action

• Contact your U.S. Representative and ask him or her to co-sponsor Horse Transportation Safety Act (H.R. 4040). • Take  action at AWI online »  • Follow the progress of this bill at Congress.org »

Related Reading

30 horses die in tractor-trailer fire on Interstate 81, Tuesday’s Horse, May 8, 2013 »

Slaughter bound horse trailer Nashville TN June 2012
Horses from Three Angels Farms are transferred from collapsed trailer on I-440 south of Nashville. The trailer was on the way to slaughter house in Mexico, police say. The driver received multiple citations. This is the second accident involving horses being trucked to slaughter by Dorian Ayache’s Three Angels Farm in Lebanon. Source image.

• Driver of slaughter bound horse trailer crash in Tennessee issued multiple citations, Tuesday’s Horse, Jun. 14, 2012 »

• At least one slaughter bound horse killed in Tennessee trailer crash, Tuesday’s Horse, Jun. 12, 2012 »

• Horses injured in Tennessee trailer crash rejected at Mexican slaughterhouse, Tuesday’s Horse, Feb. 17, 2012 »

• Trucker exposes Three Angels slaughter monger Dorian Ayache for horse cruelty, Tuesday’s Horse, Jan. 21, 2012 »

• Driver cited in Tenn horse trailer crash that killed three, Tuesday’s Horse, Jan. 19, 2012 »

Rodeo Horses

Slaughter horses aren’t the only horses travelled in double deckers. Rodeo horses are travelled in them too. Rodeo people however claim that they modify the trailers to give the horses adequate headroom. Perhaps some of them do.

Deaths of rescued slaughter bound horses a painful reminder not much has changed

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HORSE SLAUGHTER (by Vivian Grant Farrell) — 2017 has been a tough year for many reasons. The toughest for me personally has been the deaths of two beloved horses.

Fourteen years ago, when Texans for Horses became the Fund for Horses I rescued four slaughter bound Quarter horses from a Texas feedlot. They had no papers. No one could or would tell us where they were from or how they had gotten in this hellish place.

Many of the horses in the feedlot had given up. They would not eat or drink, just crowded together for comfort staring vacantly ahead.

There were some however who still showed signs of hope crammed around the fence with terrified eyes beseeching someone anyone to help them. I picked four. It was all I could afford to transport home and care for. I named them after Texas cities — Houston, Austin, Amarillo and Sweetwater.

Turning my back on the others and walking away from them knowing the horrific sufferings and deaths they were about to face haunts me to this day. And for what? So human beings can dine on their dead flesh.

I can feel the awful pain and anguish of that moment just as keenly now as I did that day, and I still hate that I did not find a way to help every pleading one of them.

Two of the four horses I rescued, the mares Houston and Sweetwater, passed away a few years ago. Austin died in February of this year and Amarillo died last month in November. Both geldings, they had made friends in that grisly pasture 14 years ago, ending up spending the rest of their lives together.

Their deaths seem to signal an end for me but of what I am not certain. At first I thought that it might be hope. Very little to nothing has changed. Slaughter continues to thrive on the horses it brutally preys on.

I wish I could say with the passing of those horses that I rescued that day and escaped slaughter, that slaughter had finally been outlawed and no longer threatened any horse.

God knows we have worked as smartly and diligently as we know how to ban horse slaughter as have many, many others. However, it still exists to satisfy the human appetite for horse flesh, and making the people who supply it for them very wealthy.

My Christmas wish this year is that you will do any or all of the following to bring an end to horse slaughter in honour of horses past, present and future.

Continue to work or take up the cause to bring an end to horse slaughter. It does not matter how or where or what. Please take every action you know and hear to bring it to an end.

Support those who rescue horses from slaughter. Adopt a rescued horse yourself or sponsor one. Pledge or make a monthly donation, any amount. Find your local horse rescue and ask them what is on their Wish List — many have one — and gift them something on their list, either individually or with family and friends. Deliver it to the rescue and meet and greet the horses you are benefiting. It will make you feel like a million dollars. I promise.

Make a pledge in your heart right now that this time next year horses will no longer be slaughtered where you live and take action inn support of that pledge every opportunity you get.

We can do this. You can be sure that Houston, Austin, Amarillo and Sweetwater, and all horses like them, will be cheering you on.

Featured Image: AdobeStock_128452626.jpeg. Not for profit use.