Annual Spring Fundraiser

Hello, it’s that time again. Our Annual Spring Fundraiser.

Please make a donation of $10.00 (or more) so we can spring forward with our work on behalf of horses. Spring forward…. did we just say that? Yes, we did!

We work steadily, year after year, on issues that impact the health, safety and welfare of horses in North America and around the world wherever we identify a need and feel we can help.

The Horse Fund is in its 15th year. No one does what we do. No one does it the way we do it. Or gets done what we get done.  That’s because we work across the spectrum of horse safety and protection issues wherever it takes us.

Please support us with a donation of $10.00. Right here. Right now. Thank you!

Learn more about The Horse Fund at horsefund.org.

Horse shopping!

Have you been to our Gift Shop lately? Did you even know we had a Gift Shop? Well, we do and there are all sorts of cool things there created by us and other horse lovers.

The reason we mention it is there is a 40% off sale going on greeting cards. These are always handy to have around and equine themed greeting cards aren’t that easy to find in a regular shop.

Here are some Collections Vivian put together.

Unicorn Collection

Pegasus Collection

Silhouette Horses

 

Buy one or 100. Customize them with our own personal message. And more. Thank you for stopping by!

Welcome to 2018

Hello and welcome to another year at Tuesday’s Horse.

We have a lot planned for 2018. Some old. Some new.

As we gear up to roll out those changes let us know what you would like to see, what you would like us to do more of, or less of. Anything. Everything. Regarding horse protection and welfare issues.

Your feedback is important to us. Email us at info@horsefund.org or leave us a message in comments.


Featured image: iStock.

New York State lawmakers interested in tracking retired racehorses

Thoroughbred racehorse. Unattributed image.
Thoroughbred racehorse. Unattributed image.

HORSE RACING (via the Blood-Horse online). By Tom Precious, October 26, 2017.

An effort to mandate the tracking of retired racehorses in New York has now picked up support in both houses of the state Legislature.

Sen. Joseph Addabbo, a Queens Democrat who represents Aqueduct Racetrack, recently introduced a measure to create a seven-member Commission on Retired Racehorses to monitor the whereabouts and treatment of retired Thoroughbreds and Standardbreds. The new Senate bill by Addabbo, the ranking Democrat on the Senate Racing, Gaming, and Wagering Committee, is the same as one introduced in the Assembly earlier this year by Gary Pretlow, a Westchester County Democrat who chairs that chamber’s racing committee.

“Horses have played a significant role in the history and culture of the United States,” a bill memo accompanying the legislation states, noting that racehorses in New York have generated billions of dollars in economic activity in the state.

“Despite what they may have contributed, many horses at a young age (that) are no longer profitable or affordable for the owner, wind up in international slaughterhouses to be inhumanely slaughtered for consumption abroad where horse meat is a major delicacy,” the bill memo adds.

The bill puts reporting requirements on horse owners, requiring reports to be filed with the state within 72 hours of any ownership change of a retired racehorse, along with contact information about owners and other recordkeeping rules. The death of a former racehorse must also be reported to a state registry within 72 hours. Each violation of the measure’s provisions can be assessed a fine up to $500–if violators are a resident of New York State.

Using Jockey Club data, the NYSGC spent nearly two years compiling the whereabouts of every New York-bred Thoroughbred that raced between 2010 and 2012. Of 3,894 horses that raced in that period, the commission was able to locate 1,871 horses. Of those, 356 were deceased, three sold at auction and 1,512 were retired in some form, such as 604 retired as broodmares or 155 adopted.

Read full report »