Rainhill Equine Facility benefits from 3 degree guarantee fundraiser

Rainhill Equine Facility resident, located in Warren County, Kentucky.

WBKO—ABC, Channel 13, Bowling Green, Kentucky filed the following story:

WARREN COUNTY, Ky. (WBKO) — For the month of July, weather director Chris Allen has been working to predict temps within three degrees, and then Service One Credit Union will donate to a particular charity for each accurate day.

Karen Thurman cares for 48 rescued horses at her nonprofit farm, Rainhill Equine Facility. Rainhill Equine Facility will benefit from July’s fundraising efforts.

“I’m one of the few rescues in the United States that even takes blind horses,” said Karen Thurman, founder of Rainhill Equine Facility.

Thurman has been running the horse sanctuary in Warren County since 2001.

The nonprofit, located on a 185 acre farm, currently cares for 48 horses, all with different stories of what led up to their arrival. Horses from all over the country now find their home there.

Karen Thurman cares for 48 rescued horses at her nonprofit farm, Rainhill Equine Facility. (Photo: Madison Martin)
Karen Thurman cares for 48 rescued horses at her nonprofit farm, Rainhill Equine Facility. (Photo: Madison Martin)

Over 30 years ago, the farm had first housed a riding facility, eventually then taking care of old race horses.

She started getting calls to rescue blind horses. Today, out of the dozens of horses she cares for, 34 of them are completely blind.

“Well, you can’t even tell, can you? They have friends, they have stuff that they do. They know where their food is. They have a regular life; nobody would ever know except for maybe a little run-in with the fence occasionally,” said Thurman.

The money from the 3 Degree Guarantee will be going towards a new barn, whose plans are in the works.

“It’s a hard job. You don’t do this because it’s fun,” said Thurman. “You do this because God has put something in your heart and told you to do it.”

The check will be presented to Thurman on AMKY on WBKO-ABC August 2.

*   *   *   *   *

Make a donation directly to Rainhill on their website or buy them something from their list. See below.

Thurman states:

Our wonderful local feed store has generously set up an account for us so that anyone wanting to donate items can call and purchase things over the phone; they hold the items for us. Anything helps out! Monday through Saturday, call:

Southern States
270-842-8157
640 Plum Springs Loop
Bowling Green, Ky, 42101

Here’s a video Ms Thurman posted in 2016 which will give you further insight into the work of this amazing, loving woman.

Let’s make this an extra Feel Good Friday by helping this dedicated lady and the horses who have sanctuary there.

Thank you everyone.

FACEBOOK
https://www.facebook.com/RainhillEquineFacility/

ON THE WEB
http://rainhillequinefacili.wixsite.com/refhome

STORY SOURCE
https://www.wbko.com/content/news/Rainhill-Equine-Facility-serving-blind-horses-to-benefit-from–513518621.html

H.R. 961 & S. 2006 — Take Action Kansas and Kentucky

US Capitol Dome and Flag.

US Capitol Dome and Flag.

H.R. 961 — The “SAFE Act of 2019” & S. 2006

A big hello and welcome to the horse loving citizens of Kansas and Kentucky.

Are you ready to take action and help get us the necessary cosponsors to blast H.R. 961 (The SAFE Act of 2019), out of Committee and onto the House Floor for a vote? Right now H.R. 961 has 160 cosponsors. Our target — 290!

Below are the U.S. Representatives from the States of Kansas and Kentucky. The ones who have already cosponsored are marked with a big YES.

KANSAS (KS)

District 1: Roger Marshall [R]
District 2: Steve Watkins [R]
District 3: Sharice Davids (D) — YES!
District 4: Ron Estes [R]

KENTUCKY (KY)

District 1: James Comer [R]
District 2: Brett Guthrie ([R]
District 3: John Yarmuth [D] — YES!
District 4: Thomas Massie ([R]
District 5: Hal Rogers ([R]
District 6: Andy Barr [R] — YES!

If they have not cosponsored, you know what to do. Contact them now and ask them to please cosponsor this important bill that protects people from being exposed to toxic horse meat and horses from slaughter.

Here’s a link that walks you through it without leaving Tuesday’s Horse.

S. 2006

Please note that H.R. 961 now has a companion bill in the U.S. Senate — S. 2006, so contact both of your U.S. Senators too while you are there. Please note that this is a bipartisan issue.

Twitter

Share this on Twitter. Popular hashtags are #HR961 #Yes2SAFE #HorseMeat #FoodSafety #NoToxicHorseMeat

Last updated 7/18/2019 3 pm EST

The killing fields of Churchill Downs and horse racing

Historic twin spires of Churchill Downs where racehorses are routinely killed. Photo by Abbie Myers.

Tim Sullivan, writing for the Louisville Courier-Journal states:

Of the 25 racetracks that share their casualty counts with the public, only one was more deadly last year than Churchill Downs.

And despite its recent rash of gloomy headlines, it wasn’t Santa Anita.

Only Illinois’ Hawthorne Race Course lost horses at a faster pace than Churchill Downs did in 2018, according to the Jockey Club’s Equine Injury Database.

Over the past three years, only the boutique meet conducted at California’s Sonoma County Fair exceeded Churchill’s race-related mortality rate.

Unlike its Kentucky colleagues at Keeneland and Turfway Park, Churchill Downs does not publicly disclose its racing fatalities, but a spokesman for the track confirmed figures obtained through a public records request of the Kentucky Horse Racing Commission.

Those records show the home of the Kentucky Derby has lost 43 thoroughbreds to racing injuries since 2016, a 2.42 per 1,000-start average that was 50 percent higher than the national average during the same three-year span.

Last year, with 16 fatalities in 5,856 starts, Churchill’s death rate was higher still: 2.73 per 1,000.

Source: https://www.courier-journal.com/story/sports/horses/horse-racing/2019/03/27/churchill-downs-horse-fatalities/3284846002/

Safety of Racehorses Comes in Dead Last

Ruben Hernandez, writing for the Louisville Courier-Journal on this year’s Run for the Roses observes:

To argue that other horses were put danger is an issue that should be taken up with the management of Churchill Downs because 20 horses don’t enter themselves into the race. Based on this logic, one would have to conclude that a field of this size is put in danger once the gates open.

Source: https://www.courier-journal.com/story/opinion/2019/05/10/reader-supports-maximum-security-kentucky-derby-win/1163058001/


Our View

There is no “fix”. Certainly not one that can be done quickly with any type of regulation. The horse has “bolted” so to speak. It will take years of clean breeding to return racehorses to the durability and robustness required. In saying that, it very well may be too late for American bred horses.

US racehorses are suffering catastrophic breakdowns and deaths because of decades long chemical abuse. They are administered a virtual unending list of drugs from the time they are foaled until they reach a racecourse — if they ever arrive there. This over zealous drugging has a debilitating impact which is being passed on from offspring to offspring. Weakness and unsoundness are being bred in.

We are right on the money, but don’t take our word for it. Consider these words:

“Chemical horses produce chemical babies. Performance-enhancing drugs must be banned if we are going to survive as an industry and if thoroughbreds are going to survive as a robust breed.”

– Arthur Hancock
Breeder of Three Kentucky Derby Winners

Big Brown wins the Kentucky Derby in 2008. Image: Photo: Reed Palmer/Churchill Downs.
Big Brown wins the Kentucky Derby in 2008. Image: Photo: Reed Palmer/Churchill Downs.

2008 US Triple Crown hopeful Big Brown, seen winning the Kentucky Derby above, received regularly monthly treatments of Winstrol, an anabolic steroid banned in 10 states—yet in none of the states where the Triple Crown horse races are contested.

Jane Allin writes:

The current state of horse racing in North America is best described as a volatile cocktail fueled by economic greed together with increasingly fragile horses and pervasive drug administration that has transformed this once distinguished “Sport of Kings” into a controversial, much maligned commercial industry rife with abuse and disregard for its athletes.

It all just needs to stop.

Log In

Log in / Create a Log in to comment »

Related Reading

Time Magazine
http://time.com/5582343/horse-deaths-kentucky-derby/ »

The Horse Fund
https://horsefund.org/the-chemical-horse-part-1.php »

Kentucky lawyer leases land to protect horses, plans sanctuary in coal country

A horse from the groups that run free in coal country in Eastern Kentucky. Accredited to JERVIS PICS.

JACKSON, Ky. (Source Article) —  Curtis Bostic is an attorney, a politician and — for a few weeks in 2016 — an accused horse thief.

On a cold December day in the rugged hilltops of Breathitt County, Bostic was trying to rescue some horses he said had been abandoned and were malnourished. But he was arrested by a sheriff’s deputy, who said the horses belonged to two men who follow the local custom of setting them free in the winter to wander the wilderness of the county’s abandoned coal fields.

The charges were later dismissed after the sheriff’s department said it didn’t have probable cause to make the arrest. But during the night Bostic spent in jail, he came up with an idea: A few weeks later, he leased the land where he had been arrested. He sent a letter to the two men who had pressed charges against him. Now, they were the trespassers, and Bostic ordered them to come get their horses before he put them up for adoption.

“I can’t change the full county. But I can say you are not going to come to my property and drop your horse off in the cold winter,” Bostic said.

Bostic wants to turn 4,000 acres of former coal mines into a horse sanctuary. It’s the latest idea on how to tackle the growing horse population in the mountains of Kentucky, a state known more for pampered thoroughbreds on pristine farms than bony horses roaming free.

Bostic’s descriptions of thousands of horses suffering at the hands of cruel owners have offended the locals who say he doesn’t understand their culture.

Clifton Hudson, 30, owns five horses that he sets free to wander land he doesn’t own near his home in Breathitt County. He said he provides 600 pounds of salt each month for the horses. He stopped hauling hay bales to the land because the horses were not eating them, a sign he says means they have plenty of grass to graze. The locals often bring their children to the mountains on the weekends to pet and feed the horses.

“It’s just really it’s more of a pastime than anything else with the people of the county,” Hudson said. “So far the only person really had an issue with it has been Mr. Bostic.”

Wild horses have been a familiar sight in the Kentucky mountains for decades. But following the Great Recession and the thousands of jobs lost because of the disappearing coal industry, more horses have been set loose. Read the full story »

Source: WCPO Cincinnati. Report originally filed by the Associated Press. Written by Adam Beam . Featured image by Jervis Pics.