Livestock auction in New Holland where meat men prey on horses is banning photos and videos

MARCH AGAINST HORSE SLAUGHTER — News of the Horse reports that the livestock auction in New Holland, Pennsylvania, is banning photos and videos.

New Holland auction is notorious among horse lovers chiefly because it is one of the largest sales rings where horses are dumped in some of the most deplorable circumstances imaginable and preyed on by meat man acting on behalf of horse slaughter plants in Canada and Mexico.

Anyone with even the slightest knowledge of horse slaughter has heard of New Holland auction.

It is where thousands of horses each year enter what has commonly become referred to as the “slaughter pipeline”.

Ford Turner, reporting for McClatchy-Tribune Informational Services, writes:

Every Monday, 200 or more thoroughbreds, Amish-owned work animals, Tennessee walkers, tiny “miniatures” and other varieties of horses pass between tiered plank seats full of auction spectators. The roughly 1,500 consignors, or sellers, who bring animals to the auction every week come from Pennsylvania, Virginia, Ohio, Kentucky, Maine and elsewhere.

Jo Parto, a humane police officer with Animal Rescue League of Berks County, said [in 2014] New Holland gained a reputation in years past because of cruelty cases. But, she said, New Holland “has cleaned up a lot. They try not to take in the skinny, injured horses.”

Skinny, injured horses are not going to bring much of a price if any, even by the meat man — or should we say especially by the meat man. Meat men, also called kill buyers, are typically paid by the pound. Skinny horses don’t produce much meat. Injured horses aren’t likely to survive the long, painful journey to Mexico or Canada crammed together with other terrified horses with no food or water in all temperatures.

And if New Holland has cleaned up its act, why are they banning photos and videos?

It is pretty apparent to us it is because New Holland auction no longer wants the egregious acts of cruelty committed against the luckless animals who pass through its hands to be exposed and documented. The ones below are cases in point.

Lancaster Online reported in November, 2016:

Animal cruelty officers hope DNA testing will help find the former owner of three mutilated horses found this week at New Holland Sales Stables. Someone used a caustic or acidic substance to obliterate identifying tattoos on the inner lips of the thoroughbred horses, according to veterinarian Dr. James Holt, who works for the auction house. The mares were turned over to the Pennsylvania SPCA. Similar cases have been reported elsewhere in Pennsylvania, PSPCA spokeswoman Gillian Kocher said.

News of the Horse reported:

In May, 2016, a horse was dropped off at the sale in terrible condition. When auction workers saw investigators with Animal Angels documenting the condition of the horse, they took the horse to the back, shot it, and dumped it in the trash. See full story at Animals’ Angels.

In March, 2015, a partially blind horse that was shot over 120 times at close range by a paintball gun was found at the New Holland auction. See original story at Lancaster Online. See follow up story on the “paint ball horse” they named Lily.

Lily, the "Paint Ball Horse", abandoned at New Holland auction, was rescued by Jon Stewart and his wife Tracey. She was treated at New Bolton where she had to have an eye removed, and retired to a sanctuary. Sadly, Lily died, peacefully, shortly thereafter. The owner who dumped Lily at New Holland later said the mare was not hit with paint balls but was "used as a canvass".
Lily, the “Paint Ball Horse”, abandoned at New Holland auction, was rescued by Jon Stewart and his wife Tracey. She was treated at New Bolton where she had to have an eye removed, and retired to a sanctuary. Sadly, Lily died, peacefully, shortly thereafter. The owner who dumped Lily at New Holland later said the mare was not hit with paint balls but was “used as a canvass”.

News of the Horse point out:

It is illegal in Pennsylvania to sell a horse that “which by reason of debility, disease or lameness, or for other cause, could not be worked or used without violating the laws against cruelty to animals, or leads, rides, drives or transports any such horse for any purpose, except that of conveying the horse to the nearest available appropriate facility for its humane keeping or destruction or for medical or surgical treatment.” See https://www.animallaw.info/statute/pa-cruelty-consolidated-cruelty-statutes.

Where are the people working for the USDA who reportedly have an office at New Holland auction while these crimes are being committed?

Then there’s this.

“We have a lot of Amish who come to the sale, and they don’t like their picture being taken to begin with,” auction part owner Ryan Colb told reporters.

For images of horses at New Holland auction, please see “A Day at New Holland“. Viewer discretion advised.

FEATURED IMAGE
A band of heavily pregnant Thoroughbred mares, including a badly crippled horse whose future at the time was uncertain, are rescued from the New Holland Auction Feb. 29, 2016. Via Off Track Thoroughbreds.

Alberta SPCA explains why seized horses sent to auction

You have probably seen this by now, as the story has been making the rounds. Before we get to that, I have a question. What is it about horses that even so-called animal protection organizations feel it is okay to slaughter them? They certainly would not be so eager to kill dogs and cats for the same purpose. Or would they? They say dogs and cats are labeled pets, and horses are labeled livestock. My next question is . . So what?

Global News Canada

By Mia Sosiak and Tamara Elliott

Ground Horse Meat Canada
Alberta SPCA thinks it’s just fine for horses to end up like this.
    CALGARY- The Alberta SPCA is explaining why dozens of seized horses were sent to a recent livestock auction in High River, causing outrage.

    The organization seized nearly 60 starving horses from a farm near Lethbridge back in January, and some were so sick or aggressive that they had to be euthanized. 29 were sent to foster farms where they racked up $10,000 in medical and feed bills.

    The SPCA then offered the animals up at an auction in early April—and potential buyers included those looking to sell horse meat.

    “I think it’s horrendous that this is happening today, that we haven’t had an emergency adopt-a-thon of these horses,” complains horse enthusiast Keely Dobbyn. “I know lots of people that would go out and try and rescue these animals, and instead this is the easy way out.”

    However, the SPCA maintains that selling livestock at auction is more transparent than through private sales.

    “Some people could come back to us and say ‘why didn’t you give me the chance to get this horse?’ If it goes to auction, then everyone who attends the auction has the ability to bid on the horse,” explains Roland Lines, communications manager for the Alberta SPCA. “[Horses] are part of the livestock industry, so the possibility of horses going for meat is certainly there. As an agency, we don’t take a preference one way or another.”

Read full story; view video report >>

Editorial: Humane end for horses not real goal of Okla slaughter bill

Published under the title “Editorial: Humane end for horses not really goal of slaughter legislation” on Tulsa World News Opinion page, written by World’s Editorial Writers, they say:

Okla State lawmaker Skye McNeil. Image: Tulsa Business and Legal News.
Okla State lawmaker Skye McNeil. McNeil co-authored and helping to push through a bill to return horse slaughter to U.S. soil. Image: Tulsa Business and Legal News.
    In Oklahoma, it appears, being connected to a family business can qualify a legislator as someone with special expertise to propose legislation that would benefit that business.

    At least that’s the view of Skye McNiel, R-Bristow, who has proposed legislation that would allow horse slaughter in Oklahoma. She’s something of an expert on the business, because her family operates the largest horse auction house in the state. Emphasis added.

    She admits that legalized horse slaughter in Oklahoma could mean financial gain for her grandparents’ auction house, which is managed by her family. She used to work there, too, but now just helps out occasionally.

    But other horse auctioneers also would benefit from horse slaughter, so that makes it OK for her to be proposing this legislation, she contends.

    “It’s no different from an attorney running a tort reform bill or a pharmacist running a pharmacy bill,” McNiel said. “I’m from rural Oklahoma, and I run rural legislation. I mean, who better to understand policy than somebody who lives it every day?”

:: Read full article here >>

EXPRESS YOURSELF

Speaker of the House
Rep. T.W. Shannon (R-62)
tw.shannon@okhouse.gov
(405) 557-7374

Rep. Skye McNeil (R-29)
skye.mcniel@okhouse.gov
405) 557-7353

Full Oklahoma House >>

READER COMMENTS

This comment is not to be missed, written by someone identified as 206884:

Here is the NEW Oklahoma Song!

    There’s never been a better time to end a life-
    It ain’t too early and it aint too late!
    Starting out as a weanling with a brand new life-
    Living in a horse slaughter state!
    Horse slaughter state-
    Ain’t gonna treat you right!
    Gonna send you to meet your fate
    So you can become a steak on someone’s plate
    Plen’y of air and plen’y of room,
    Plen’y of room to run and gallop!
    Plen’y of heart and plen’y of hope.

    OOOOk-lahoma, where the blood comes oozing down the plain,
    And you can smell decaying meat, When the wind comes right behind the rain
    OOOOk-lahoma, Ev’ry night my horse and I, Stand alone and watch the slaughter trucks pass by.

    We know our horses belong to the land (yo-ho)
    And the land they belong to is grand!
    And when we say
    Yeeow! Aye-yip-aye-yo-ee-ay!
    We’re only sayin’
    You’re Not doin’ fine, Oklahoma!
    Oklahoma is not O.K.!

    OOOOk-lahoma, where the blood comes oozing down the plain,
    And you can smell decaying meat, When the wind comes right behind the rain
    OOOOk-lahoma, Ev’ry night my horse and I, Stand alone and watch the slaughter trucks pass by.

    We know our horses belong to the land (yo-ho)
    And the land they belong to is grand!
    And when we say
    Yeeow! Aye-yip-aye-yo-ee-ay!
    We’re only sayin’
    You’re Not doin’ fine, Oklahoma!
    Oklahoma is not O.K.!

    Okla-okla-Okla-Okla-Okla-Okla
    Okla-okla-Okla-Okla-Okla-Okla…

    We know they belong to the land
    And the land they belong to is grand!
    And when we say
    Yeeow! Aye-yip-aye-yo-ee-ay!
    We’re only sayin’
    You’re not doin’ fine, Oklahoma!
    Oklahoma
    S-L-A-U-G-H-T-E-R
    In OKLAHOMA!
    Boo Hoo!

The most viewed comment is Bruce Plante’s “d*ck head” cartoon. See it here >>

Asmussen slaughter mares rescued

It seems inconceivable that a member of a prominent horse racing family that includes a celebrated jockey and trainer does not know when he is sending horses to an auction frequented by buyers for a slaughter plant. However, that is what Keith Asmussen, father of retired international jockey Cash Asmussen and noted American Thoroughbred racehorse trainer Steve Asmussen, is claiming.

Esther Marr and Ron Mitchell reporting for The Blood-Horse write:

Ten broodmares at a Texas livestock auction frequented by kill buyers were shipped there by Keith Asmussen’s Asmussen Horse Center July 7.

Nine of the mares—two of which are by top sires Storm Cat and Triple Crown winner Seattle Slew—were purchased by a Thoroughbred aftercare activist and are now under the care of Donna Keen’s Remember Me Rescue. Located 50 miles west of Austin, Texas, the Round Mountain sale is allegedly attended by many buyers that ship their purchases to Mexico to be slaughtered for human consumption.

Asmussen told reporters:

“As far as I am concerned (this was a legitimate horse sale), and I had no idea about the killer buyers until (horse rescue activists) started writing me letters.”

The mares are reportedly in good condition except for one who is slightly underweight. They will be checked the weekend of July 14 to see how many are in foal.

The list of rescued horses reads as follows:

—Valid Obsession, a 20-year-old daughter of Valid Appeal and a full sister to sires Valid Expectations and Littleexpectations. She is reported to have a 2012 foal by Asmussen Horse Center stallion Intimidator and was bred back to that stallion for 2013.

—Luxury of Time, a 17-year-old daughter of Seattle Slew. She was bred to Intimidator for 2013.

—Adios La Cucaracha, a 15-year-old daughter of Storm Cat with a 2012 foal by Intimidator and bred to Intimidator for 2013.

—Rhododendron, a 7-year-old daughter of Mutakddim. She has a 2012 foal by Seneca Jones and was bred to Intimidator for 2013.

—Our Revival, a 12-year-old daughter of Ide with a 2012 foal by Heckle and bred to Asmussen Horse Center stallion Primal Storm for 2013.

—Endless Storm, a 20-year-old daughter of Storm Bird with a 2012 foal by Intimidator and bred to Intimidator for 2013.

—Ethel Is Best, a 13-year-old daughter of Woodman. She was bred to Intimidator for 2013.

—Karitsas Punch, a 14-year-old daughter of Two Punch. She was bred to Asmussen Horse Center stallion Littleexpectations for 2013.

—Fans Galore, a 15-year-old daughter of Lear Fan. She was bred to Primal Storm for 2013.

—Empress Jones, an 8-year-old daughter of Seneca Jones with a 2012 foal by Heckle and bred to Intimidator for 2013.

The rescue was first reported by the Paulick Report.

Read more on BloodHorse.com: http://www.bloodhorse.com/horse-racing/articles/71203/asmussen-mares-now-at-remember-me-rescue#ixzz20Rw9nG4n

Featured image: Trainer Steve Asmussen at the rail, Belmont Park, 2011. Source: Kathleen Toler, Flickr.