March against horse slaughter 2020 finale

Horses are shipped to Korea to be slaughtered.

March Against Horse Slaughter 2020 ends tomorrow March 31.

When we planned our March campaign against horse slaughter, we did not know that the nation and the world would be in crisis. We know it has been a scary and distracting time for so many and your thoughts and concerns have been elsewhere.

Thank you to everyone who have read, “liked”, commented and shared our March Against Horse Slaughter 2020 posts.

A huge thank you to Jane Allin who has so diligently provided us yet again with her peerless reports.

New Campaign

The numbers and information Jane Allin provided us during March Against Horse Slaughter 2020 have helped us at the Fund for Horses tremendously in planning where to the launch its new innovative campaign against horse slaughter and horse meat consumption.

It is a unique and inspired international campaign and we are very excited about it. We were going to begin on the final day of March, but of course the timing is anything but advantageous. So, it is back to the drawing board regarding a date and time. We are putting our collective heads together to determine when the most optimum time will be. Stay tuned! In the meantime, we would love to have your input too.

Final day

We will have an Action Alert on our final day, so please check back with us tomorrow, March 31st.

All reports

In the meantime, here are links to all of Jane Allin’s horse slaughter and horse meat production reports.

Horse slaughter and horse meat production worldwide — Introduction »

Horse slaughter and horse meat production — A global perspective »

Top 10 countries ranked by horses slaughtered and horse meat production — 2018 »

Top 10 importers and exporters of horse meat worldwide »

All posts

Here is a link to everything we posted during this year’s March Against Horse Slaughter campaign »

Stay safe and be well.


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Canada’s horse slaughter plants and US ports of entry

Truck full of slaugherbound horses. Image via Glogster.com.

By JANE ALLIN

MARCH AGAINST HORSE SLAUGHTER

Horse Slaughter Plants — Canada

Three slaughterhouses are federally licensed to slaughter horses in Canada:

(1) Viande Richelieu Inc. in Massueville, Que.; Reg No 076; 
https://www.vianderichelieu.com/ 

(2) Les Viandes de la Petite-Nation in St-Andre- Avellin, Que.; [517 Rang Sainte Julie E, Saint-André-Avellin, QC J0V 1W0]; Reg No 505; (no website)

(3) Bouvry Export Calgary Ltd. in Fort MacLeod, Alta.; Reg No 506;
https://www.bouvrycanada.ca/ 

Canada — US Ports of Entry

Here are the only designated ports of entry for slaughter-bound horses:

Canadian Food Inspection Agency Port of Entry:Corresponding US Port of Entry
Kingsgate, British Columbia
250-417-2293
Eastport, Idaho
208-267-2396
Coutts, Alberta
403-344-3808
Sweetgrass, Montana
406-335-9610
North Portal, Saskatchewan
306-927-2255
Portal, North Dakota
701-926-4281
Sarnia (Point Edward), Ontario
519-332-3031
Port Huron, Michigan
517-324-5298
Windsor, Ontario
519-969-2522
Detroit, Michigan
313-226-4428
Niagara Falls (Queenston), Ontario
905-937-7434
Lewiston, New York
716-297-6203
Saint-Bernard-de-Lacolle, Quebec
450-246-4125
Champlain, New York
518-298-2191
Woodstock, New Brunswick
506-325-1960
Houlton, Maine
207-532-6099
Source: https://www.inspection.gc.ca/animal-health/humane-transport/horses/designated-border-ports/eng/1324090361423/1324310392596

Updated Apr. 2, 2020 — Canadian Premium Meats Inc. in Lacombe, Alta. is no longer in operation.

Featured Image: Glogster.com.


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Top 10 importers and exporters of horse meat worldwide

A horse in slaughter buyer Mike McCarron's trailer in Cleburne, Texas, August, 2019. USA Today.

By Jane Allin

MARCH AGAINST HORSE SLAUGHTER — Recall from the previous articles in this series, that the FAO stats are not always based on original datasets for countries included in their assessments. The FAO Statistics Division addressed this by developing innovative methods to improve data reliability and consistency across statistical domains.

As a result, the numbers quoted in the last two articles did not always reflect those seen elsewhere, however they provided a framework and a general guideline for the overall distribution of horse meat production and horse slaughter across the globe. 

By contrast, the FAO numbers obtained for the top ten importers and exports of horse meat, apart from China (aggregate numbers based on imputation methods), are the official data from each country and so provide a more accurate picture of the global distribution of imports and exports.

Moreover, the most recent data for these numbers are from 2017, as opposed to 2018 for the horse slaughter and horse meat production.

The data collected will consider the following:

  • The top 10 horse meat importers in both quantity (tonnes) and value (1000s of USD) in 2017. Note that the most recent data for these numbers are from 2017, as opposed to 2018 for the horse slaughter and horse meat production
  • A comparison of the top ten horse meat importers (quantity and value) between 2017 and 2013 – a 4-year span.  This is to compare what we looked at in 2015 where the most recent data at that time was from 2013.
  • The top 10 horse meat exporters in both quantity (tonnes) and value (1000s of USD) in 2017.
  • A comparison of the top ten horse meat exporters (quantity and value) between 2017 and 2013 – a 4-year span.  

Top 10 Horse Meat Importers (Quantity in Tonnes)

The top 10 horse meat importing countries in quantity (tonnes) globally (2017) were responsible for about 94% of the world’s total as shown in Table 1 and Figure 1.

This represents 109,254 tonnes or roughly 241 million pounds. China (~20%) and Italy (~19%) were the two highest importers of horse meat.

Table 1.  Horse meat imports (tonnes) and percent of total globally — 2019

Figure 1.  Horse meat imports (tonnes) and percent of total globally — 2017

Changes in Horse Meat Imports from 2013 to 2019 — Top 10 Importing Countries (quantity)

From 2013 to 2017 there was a 7.1% increase in the quantity of horse meat imported for the top 10 importing countries in the world. This amounts to a total of 7,238 tonnes or ~ 16 million lb.

The most notable increase in horse meat imports was observed for China with an incredibly large increase of over 1300% or about 48 million pounds of imported horse meat. Voracious appetites indeed. Imports from the Netherlands’ also reported a large increase of about 170% or about 18 million lb.  Of note is that in 2013 China ranked 12th in the world but moved up to the number 1 spot in 2017. 

Apart from Japan (~23% or ~2 million lb.) and Bulgaria (~14% or ~ 600,000 lb.), which also had increased imports, imports in all other countries, each of which were ranked in the top 10 in 2013, decreased. The largest decreases were observed for Belgium (~ 38% or ~20 million lb.) and Switzerland (~34% or ~ 3 million lb.). 

Overall 4, countries (China, The Netherlands, Japan and Bulgaria) increased imports of horse meat by about 69 million lb. and the remaining 6 decreased imports by about 53 million lb. for a net increase of about 16 million lb. (actual = 7,238 tonnes = 15,959,790).

This is shown in Table 2 and Figure 2.

Table 2. Horse meat imports (tonnes) — comparison of 2013 and 2017

Figure 2. Horse meat imports (tonnes) — comparison of 2013 and 2017

Top 10 Horse Meat Importers (Value in 1000’s of USD)

The top 10 horse meat importing countries in value (1000’s of USD) globally (2017) are responsible for about 95% of the world’s total horse meat value as shown in Table 3 and Figure 3.

This represents 427,612 in 1000’s of USD or roughly 428 million USD. Italy’s import value of about 100 million USD (~22%) is by far the largest of the global total.

Table 3. Horse meat imports (1000’s of USD) and percent of total globally – 2017

Figure 3. Horse meat imports (1000’s of USD) and percent of total globally — 2017

Changes in Horse Meat Imports from 2013 to 2019 – Top 10 Importing Countries (Value)

From 2013 to 2017 there was a 10.3% decrease in the value (1000’s of USD) of horse meat imported for the top 10 importing countries in the world. This amounts to a total of about 39 million USD.

Italy, Belgium and France remained the 3 top countries for the value of horse meat imported, despite all 3 having reduced values in 2017 compared to 2013.

The most notable, increase in the value of horse meat imported to a country was observed for China with a large increase of about 182% or about 47 million USD worth of imported horse meat. The only other countries showing an increase in the value of imported horse meat were the Netherlands (~14%) and Japan (~3%). Of note is that in 2013 China ranked 13th in the world but moved up to the number 5 spot in 2017. 

The value of horse meat imports for all other countries, each of which were ranked in the top 10 in 2013, decreased. The decreases ranged from a high of Kazakhstan (~6% or ~20 million USD) to a low of ~0.6% in Italy (~15 million USD)

Overall 3, countries (China, the Netherlands and Japan) increased the value of horse meat imports by about 85 million USD and the remaining 7 decreased imports by about 124 million USD for a net decrease of ~39 million USD.

This is shown in Table 4 and Figure 4.

Table 4. Horse meat imports (1000’s of USD) — comparison of 2013 and 2017

Figure 4. Horse meat imports (1000’s of USD) – comparison of 2013 and 2017

Top 10 Horse Meat Exporters (Quantity in Tonnes) — 2017

The top 10 horse meat exporting countries in quantity (tonnes) globally (2017) were responsible for about 81% of the world’s total as shown in Table 5 and Figure 5.

This represents 107,465 tonnes or roughly 237 million pounds. Mongolia (~20%) was the largest horse meat exporter followed by Argentina.

Table 5. Horse meat exports (tonnes) and percent of total globally — 2017

Figure 5. Horse meat exports (tonnes) and percent of total globally — 2017

Changes in Horse Meat Exports from 2013 to 2019 – Top 10 Exporting Countries (Quantity)

From 2013 to 2017 there was a 23.7% increase in the quantity of horse meat exported for the top 10 exporting countries in the world. This amounts to a total of 25,507 tonnes or ~ 56 million lb.

The most notable increase in horse meat exports was observed for Mongolia with an incredibly large increase of over 1200% or about 53 million pounds of imported horse meat. Interestingly, Kenya that had no exports in 2013, exported 6,560 tonnes (~14.5 million lb.) in 2017. 

Romania, Uruguay, Spain and Argentina also had increased exports; 74% (~7 million lb.), 33% (~3.4 million lb.), 25% (~3 million lb.) and 6% (~ 2 million lb.) respectively. Of note is that in 2013 Mongolia ranked 12th in the world but moved up to the number 1 spot in 2017, and Kenya ranked 8th after having no exports 4 years before. 

All other countries’ exports of horse meat decreased. The largest decrease was observed for Canada (~58% or ~25 million lb.), while decreases for Belgium, and Poland were: 33% (~14 million lb.), and 26% (~24 million lb.), respectively. 

The following should clear up any questions about the questionable FAO data observed for Canadian horse slaughter increases observed between 2013 and 2018 (see previous article): 

The 58% decrease in the exports from Canada is a clear indication of the quantifiable decrease in horse slaughter that has occurred there over the past few years. Previous data taken from the FAO (see previous article re: horse slaughter and meat production) suggested that slaughter had increased. The reason for this contradiction is the use of the imputation models that are based on past trends and statistics for the horse slaughter and horse meat production (i.e. it is not “always” reliable). The data for the export values is official data and is thus authentic information.

Overall 7, countries increased exports by about 95 million lb. of horse meat and the remaining 3 decreased exports by about 39 million lb. for a net increase of about 56 million lb. (actual = 25,507 tonnes = 56,242,935‬).

This is shown in Table 6 and Figure 6.

Table 6. Horse meat exports (tonnes) — comparison of 2013 and 2017

N/A* – cannot calculate percentage increase (∞)

Figure 6. Horse meat exports (tonnes) – comparison of 2013 and 2017

Top 10 Horse Meat Exporters (Value in 1000’s of USD) — 2017

The top 10 horse meat exporting countries in value (1000’s of USD) globally (2017) were responsible for about 84% of the world’s total horse meat value as shown in Table 7 and Figure 7.

This represents 382,317 in 1000’s of USD or roughly 382 million USD. Belgium’s export value of about 64 million USD (~14%) was the largest of the global total, followed closely by Argentina’s value of about 61 million USD (~13.1%).

Table 7. Horse meat exports (1000’s of USD) and percent of total globally — 2017

Figure 7. Horse meat exports (1000’s of USD) and percent of total globally — 2017

Changes in horse meat imports from 2013 to 2019 – Top 10 importing countries (value)

From 2013 to 2017 there was a small 1.9% increase in the value (1000’s of USD) of horse meat exported for the top 10 exporting countries in the world. This amounts to a total of about 7 million USD.

Belgium remained the top country for the value of horse meat exported, despite having reduced values in 2017 compared to 2013 by about 29%.

The most notable increase in the value of horse meat exported to a country was observed for Mongolia with an exceptionally large increase of about 12oo% or ~38 million USD worth of exported horse meat. Other significant increases were observed for the Netherlands (~78%), Romania (~48%), Spain (~45%) and Uruguay (~29%). Mongolia moved from 15th in rank (2013) to 3rd, while the other countries remained in the top ten with some changes in their position. 

The value of horse meat exports for all other countries decreased. The decreases ranged from a high in Canada (~47% or ~37 million USD) to a low of ~14% in Poland (~6 million USD)

Overall 6 countries increased the value of horse meat exports by about 82 million USD and the remaining 4 decreased exports by about 75 million USD for a net decrease of ~7 million USD (actual = 6,967 million USD).

This is shown in Table 8 and Figure 8. 

Table 8. Horse meat exports (1000’s of USD) – comparison of 2013 and 2017

Figure 8. Horse meat exports (1000’s of USD) — comparison of 2013 and 2017

Summary

Imports

  • The top 10 horse meat importing countries in quantity (tonnes) globally in 2017 were responsible for about 94% of the world’s total.
  • This represents 109,254 tonnes or roughly 241 million pounds. China (~20%) and Italy (~19%) were the two highest importers of horse meat.
  • From 2013 to 2017 there was a 7.1% increase in the quantity of horse meat imported for the top 10 importing countries in the world. This amounts to a total of 7,238 tonnes or ~ 16 million lb. 
  • The most notable increase in horse meat imports was observed for China with a very large increase of over 1300% or about 48 million pounds of imported horse meat. In 2013 China ranked 12th in the world but moved up to the number 1 spot in 2017. 
  • Overall 4, countries increased imports of horse meat by about 69 million lb. and the remaining 6 decreased imports by about 53 million lb. for a net increase of about 16 million lb. 
  • The top 10 horse meat importing countries in value (1000’s of USD) globally in 2017 were responsible for about 95% of the world’s total horse meat value. This represents 427,612 in 1000’s of USD or roughly 428 million USD. 
  • Italy’s import value of about 100 million USD (~22%) was by far the largest of the global total.

Exports

  • The top 10 horse meat exporting countries in quantity (tonnes) globally in 2017 were responsible for about 81% of the world’s total. This represents 107,465 tonnes or roughly 237 million pounds. 
  • Mongolia (~20%) was the largest horse meat exporter followed by Argentina.
  • From 2013 to 2017 there was a 23.7% increase in the quantity of horse meat exported for the top 10 exporting countries in the world. This amounts to a total of 25,507 tonnes or ~ 56 million lb.
  • The most notable increase in horse meat exports was observed for Mongolia with an incredibly large increase of over 1200% or about 53 million pounds of imported horse meat. Interestingly, Kenya that had no exports in 2013, exported 6,560 tonnes (~14.5 million lb.) in 2017. 
  • Overall 7, countries increased exports in 2017 by about 95 million lb. of horse meat and the remaining 3 decreased exports by about 39 million lb. for a net increase of about 56 million lb. 
  • Belgium remained the top country for the value of horse meat exported, despite having reduced values in 2017 compared to 2013 by about 29%.
  • The top 10 horse meat exporting countries in value (1000’s of USD) globally in 2017 were responsible for about 84% of the world’s total horse meat value. This represents 382,317 in 1000’s of USD or roughly 382 million USD. 
  • Belgium’s export value of about 64 million USD (~14%) was the largest of the global total, closely followed by Argentina’s value of about 61 million USD (~13.1%).
  • From 2013 to 2017 there was a small 1.9% increase in the value (1000’s of USD) of horse meat exported for the top 10 exporting countries in the world. 
  • The most significant increase in the value of horse meat exported to a country was observed for Mongolia with a very large increase of about 12oo% or ~38 million USD worth of exported horse meat.
  • Overall 6, countries increased the value of horse meat exports by about 82 million USD and the remaining 4 decreased exports by about 75 million USD for a net decrease of ~7 million USD.

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FEATURED IMAGE: A horse looks out worriedly from slaughter buyer Mike McCarron’s trailer in Cleburne, Texas, August, 2019. USA Today.

All Related Reports

Horse slaughter and horse meat production worldwide — Introduction »

Horse slaughter and horse meat production — A global perspective »

Top 10 countries ranked by horses slaughtered and horse meat production — 2018 »

Top 10 importers and exporters of horse meat worldwide »

Horse slaughter and horse meat production worldwide — Introduction

A horse in slaughter buyer Mike McCarron's trailer in Cleburne, Texas, August, 2019. USA Today.

By JANE ALLIN

MARCH AGAINST HORSE SLAUGHTER — According to the most recent data
(2018) from the Food and Agricultural Organization of the United Nations (FAO),
horse meat production spans the globe and is a multi-million-dollar business in
terms of imports and exports across borders.[1]

The data taken from the FAO statistical database, in general, have been supplied
by governments via national publications and FAO questionnaires (paper or
electronic). To provide more comprehensive coverage of this data collection,
official data have sometimes been supplemented with data from unofficial sources
as well as information supplied by other national or international agencies.[2]

Where horse slaughter and horse meat production are concerned the data relate to
horses slaughtered within national boundaries, irrespective of their origin.
Moreover, all data shown relate to total meat production from both commercial
and farm slaughter.[3]

Despite the availability of wide-ranging information on horse slaughter and horse
meat production around the world, there are some discrepancies with the data,
presumably due to estimates based on prior years, calculated data, as well as
imputation data. Imputation data refers to replacing missing data with substituted
values using an appropriate imputation methodology.

With respect to horse slaughter and meat production the FAO fails to recognize
that since fiscal year 2006, Congress has annually prohibited the use of federal
funds to inspect horses destined for food, effectively prohibiting domestic
slaughter in the U.S. As a result, the slaughter market has shifted to Canada and
Mexico.

According to the FAO, 29,275 tonnes of horse meat, from 114,314 slaughtered
horses, were produced in the U.S. in 2018. This of course is inexplicable as horse
slaughter (for human consumption) has been effectively shut down since 2007.
However, Bravo Packing Inc. in Penns Grove, New Jersey (not to be confused with
Bravo! pet food) was, and still is, according to some sources, slaughtering horses to
be sold to zoos to feed big cats and other carnivores.

Bravo Packing has a disreputable history of shocking animal abuse; you can read more about Bravo Packing here.

In 2012, Governor Christie signed a state law banning horse slaughter for human consumption in the Garden State however Bravo opted to exploit the unfortunate loophole in the ban which fails to include the slaughter of horses in order to feed animals rather than humans. 

Since horse slaughter and horse meat production unrelated to human consumption in the US likely represents a very small total relative to other countries that slaughter horses for meat, these figures have been left out of the data used to create the charts and tables that follow.

As a final point, the FAO data does not differentiate between horse meat production intended for human consumption, from that which may be destined for pet food products or to feed exotic zoo animals. Nonetheless these data give an overview of the magnitude of horse slaughter and horse meat production on a global basis.


[1] http://www.fao.org/faostat
[2] http://fenixservices.fao.org/faostat/static/documents/QL/QL_methodology_e.pdf
[3] http://www.fao.org/faostat/en/#data/QL

Next up: Horse slaughter and horse meat production — A global perspective


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FEATURED IMAGE: A horse looks out worriedly from slaughter buyer Mike McCarron’s trailer in Cleburne, Texas, August, 2019. USA Today.

All Reports

Horse slaughter and horse meat production worldwide — Introduction »

Horse slaughter and horse meat production — A global perspective »

Top 10 countries ranked by horses slaughtered and horse meat production — 2018 »

Top 10 importers and exporters of horse meat worldwide »