Livestock auction in New Holland where meat men prey on horses is banning photos and videos

MARCH AGAINST HORSE SLAUGHTER — News of the Horse reports that the livestock auction in New Holland, Pennsylvania, is banning photos and videos.

New Holland auction is notorious among horse lovers chiefly because it is one of the largest sales rings where horses are dumped in some of the most deplorable circumstances imaginable and preyed on by meat man acting on behalf of horse slaughter plants in Canada and Mexico.

Anyone with even the slightest knowledge of horse slaughter has heard of New Holland auction.

It is where thousands of horses each year enter what has commonly become referred to as the “slaughter pipeline”.

Ford Turner, reporting for McClatchy-Tribune Informational Services, writes:

Every Monday, 200 or more thoroughbreds, Amish-owned work animals, Tennessee walkers, tiny “miniatures” and other varieties of horses pass between tiered plank seats full of auction spectators. The roughly 1,500 consignors, or sellers, who bring animals to the auction every week come from Pennsylvania, Virginia, Ohio, Kentucky, Maine and elsewhere.

Jo Parto, a humane police officer with Animal Rescue League of Berks County, said [in 2014] New Holland gained a reputation in years past because of cruelty cases. But, she said, New Holland “has cleaned up a lot. They try not to take in the skinny, injured horses.”

Skinny, injured horses are not going to bring much of a price if any, even by the meat man — or should we say especially by the meat man. Meat men, also called kill buyers, are typically paid by the pound. Skinny horses don’t produce much meat. Injured horses aren’t likely to survive the long, painful journey to Mexico or Canada crammed together with other terrified horses with no food or water in all temperatures.

And if New Holland has cleaned up its act, why are they banning photos and videos?

It is pretty apparent to us it is because New Holland auction no longer wants the egregious acts of cruelty committed against the luckless animals who pass through its hands to be exposed and documented. The ones below are cases in point.

Lancaster Online reported in November, 2016:

Animal cruelty officers hope DNA testing will help find the former owner of three mutilated horses found this week at New Holland Sales Stables. Someone used a caustic or acidic substance to obliterate identifying tattoos on the inner lips of the thoroughbred horses, according to veterinarian Dr. James Holt, who works for the auction house. The mares were turned over to the Pennsylvania SPCA. Similar cases have been reported elsewhere in Pennsylvania, PSPCA spokeswoman Gillian Kocher said.

News of the Horse reported:

In May, 2016, a horse was dropped off at the sale in terrible condition. When auction workers saw investigators with Animal Angels documenting the condition of the horse, they took the horse to the back, shot it, and dumped it in the trash. See full story at Animals’ Angels.

In March, 2015, a partially blind horse that was shot over 120 times at close range by a paintball gun was found at the New Holland auction. See original story at Lancaster Online. See follow up story on the “paint ball horse” they named Lily.

Lily, the "Paint Ball Horse", abandoned at New Holland auction, was rescued by Jon Stewart and his wife Tracey. She was treated at New Bolton where she had to have an eye removed, and retired to a sanctuary. Sadly, Lily died, peacefully, shortly thereafter. The owner who dumped Lily at New Holland later said the mare was not hit with paint balls but was "used as a canvass".
Lily, the “Paint Ball Horse”, abandoned at New Holland auction, was rescued by Jon Stewart and his wife Tracey. She was treated at New Bolton where she had to have an eye removed, and retired to a sanctuary. Sadly, Lily died, peacefully, shortly thereafter. The owner who dumped Lily at New Holland later said the mare was not hit with paint balls but was “used as a canvass”.

News of the Horse point out:

It is illegal in Pennsylvania to sell a horse that “which by reason of debility, disease or lameness, or for other cause, could not be worked or used without violating the laws against cruelty to animals, or leads, rides, drives or transports any such horse for any purpose, except that of conveying the horse to the nearest available appropriate facility for its humane keeping or destruction or for medical or surgical treatment.” See https://www.animallaw.info/statute/pa-cruelty-consolidated-cruelty-statutes.

Where are the people working for the USDA who reportedly have an office at New Holland auction while these crimes are being committed?

Then there’s this.

“We have a lot of Amish who come to the sale, and they don’t like their picture being taken to begin with,” auction part owner Ryan Colb told reporters.

For images of horses at New Holland auction, please see “A Day at New Holland“. Viewer discretion advised.

FEATURED IMAGE
A band of heavily pregnant Thoroughbred mares, including a badly crippled horse whose future at the time was uncertain, are rescued from the New Holland Auction Feb. 29, 2016. Via Off Track Thoroughbreds.

Horse abandoned at New Holland Sales had been hit with more than 100 paintballs

via YAHOO NEWS

NEW HOLLAND, Pa. (AP) — Animal cruelty officials in Pennsylvania are investigating after a horse riddled with over 100 paintball remnants was found abandoned at a stable.

Officials from the Lancaster County SPCA tell LNP (http://bit.ly/1XrDV9o) they were called to New Holland Sales Stables on Monday after the mare was found in a stall when sales ended for the day.

SPCA Executive Director Susan Martin says the 20-year-old horse was underweight and had been struck by about 130 paintballs at close range. She says the horse was “in a substantial amount of pain when touched.”

The horse hadn’t been registered for Monday’s sale and had no visible identification.

Martin says the horse appears to be an Appaloosa/Arabian mix and is blind in [her] right eye. [She’s] expected to survive after a lengthy recovery.

The horse was taken to a Kennett Square facility operated under University of Pennsylvania’s School of Veterinary Medicine.

Featured Image: A filly is lead into the sales ring (not the horse in this report). Image Source: Off Track Thoroughbreds

Horse dealer guilty of animal cruelty after New Holland sale attempt that left two horses dead

LANCASTEROnline
Reported by Tom Knapp

The surviving horse Anastasia’s Ally was taken Aug. 13 to Days End Farm Horse Rescue in Woodbine, Maryland.  She is looking better in this photo taken Oct. 8. Source Photo.
The surviving horse Anastasia’s Ally was taken Aug. 13 to Days End Farm Horse Rescue in Woodbine, Maryland. She is looking better in this photo taken Oct. 8. Source Photo.

Pennsylvania — A Mifflin County man was found guilty of nine counts of animal cruelty leading to the death of two horses and leaving a third in sickly condition.

Charles Fisher of 900 Lockport Road, Lewistown, was charged in connection with an incident July 27 outside a New Holland auction house.

Assistant District Attorney Christine Wilson said Fisher will pay a $900 fine, court costs and restitution in the amount $1,390, payable to the Lancaster County SPCA.

Besides a count of animal cruelty attached to each of the horses, Fisher was charged with additional charges for depriving the horses of necessary food and veterinary care, and for arranging the sale of animals in poor condition.

According to a report Sept. 8, Fisher was involved with transporting or arranging transport to New Holland of three Arabian-type horses — a roan-colored, a dark bay-colored and a chestnut-colored mare — in “an inhumane manner.”

Because of the “severely dilapidated condition” of the horses, they were unable to sustain their own weight during transport, according to citations filed before DJ Rodney Hartman. All three horses were described in the documents as emaciated and lethargic.

The roan horse sustained nerve damage to its leg when it fell, and the bay suffered “further stress and deterioration,” the citations said. Both had to be euthanized.

The 17-year-old chestnut mare survived.

Susan Martin, director of the Lancaster County SPCA, said the animal shelter got involved after receiving a tip about the transaction.

The horses were being sold on a Sunday evening in the parking lot at New Holland Sales Stables, 101 W. Fulton St., she said. The auction house was closed at the time and “had nothing to do with this,” Martin said.

The surviving horse was taken Aug. 13 to Days End Farm Horse Rescue in Woodbine, Maryland. Martin said the mare, named Anastasia’s Ally, is now in “very good” condition — the horse has gained 128 pounds since August.

Preliminary hearing reset in Kelsey Lefever horse slaughter fraud case

Lady Liberty (c) Bill Frymire

Public Opinion reports:

Harrisburg, PA — A hearing has been moved to Feb. 21 for a Chester County woman who allegedly took a retired thoroughbred from Chambersburg and sold it to be slaughtered in Canada for human consumption.

Kelsey Elva Lefever was scheduled to have a preliminary hearing Feb. 6. The date has been moved to Feb. 21.

Lefever, 24, Honey Brook, is accused of taking ownership of retired thoroughbreds under false claims that she would find them loving homes, then selling them all at the New Holland Horse Auction in Lancaster County.

According to a 16-page affidavit of probable cause filed by Pennsylvania State Police Trooper Colleen Shelly, the animals were ultimately purchased for $1,661 by Bruce Rotz, a Shippensburg-based “kill dealer.” Rotz then sold the horses to Viande Richelieu slaughter plant in Quebec. Read detailed report >>

Lefever, who has been charged with three felonies and two misdemeanors, was reportedly released on a $20,000.00 bond.