How a bill becomes law

Interior of the Capitol Hill dome, Washington D.C.

Who remembers Government class or Civics? Or do they even teach them any more?

It seems a large percentage of American citizens do not know how a bill becomes law. When we started, some of us at the Fund for Horses did, but most of us had very little clue.

We were in good shape though from the beginning because the founder of the Fund for Horses worked for 20 years in the legal profession. A lawyer she worked for was the author of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act and she was active from the time the bill was drafted and introduced until it became law. It was great experience for her future work in horse protection which she had no idea she would be involved with at the time.

As constituent lobbyists working for (or against) laws that impact the health and safety of horses, the more knowledgeable you are, the better an advocate you will be. Now, this does not mean you need to become an expert by any means, but it will be helpful if you have a general idea.

Action Station

If you are working on the anti slaughter and anti soring bills, please check out the following resources which we feel certain will help you a great deal. There are also loads of helpful links. Here are handy resources from our Take Action page:

• Pending Legislation (https://fundforhorses.org/advocacy-tools/pending-legislation/)

• Calling Congress (https://fundforhorses.org/advocacy-tools/calling-congress/)

• How a Bill Becomes Law (https://fundforhorses.org/advocacy-tools/how-a-bill-becomes-law/)

PopVox

POPVOX is an online constituency tool for tracking bills and contacting your Representative and Senators guaranteeing your voice will be heard and counted. We have been with them since they launched in 2010.

Visit our Stakeholder’s page at https://www.popvox.com/stakeholders/horsefund. You will find all horse legislation pending right now before Congress (there’s more than just the anti slaughter and anti soring bills), whether we endorse the bills or oppose the bills and why including detailed talking points.

Create a POPVOX account with an email and password. Weigh in on any and all legislation you want — not just those having to do with horses — and POPVOX will deliver your message directly to your legislators, guaranteed. Oh, did we mention when you sign up POPVOX identifies your legislators for you and stores it right there on your account, so you never need to look them up again! Even if they get booted out and someone else gets elected in their place.

No. We are not getting paid to promote them. We just love them. They make everything so easy. And that’s the truth.

Thank you so much for helping our horses by taking action right away.

Oh. Remember it’s the Senate version of the horse soring bill only, but both House and Senate on the horse slaughter bill. Learn more here or at POPVOX.

Or

Forgot. You can also find and contact your U.S. Representative at https://www.house.gov/ and your two U.S. Senators at https://www.senate.gov/.


Fund for Horses Logo

March 16 the deadline to speak up for Heber Wild Horses

Three Heber Wild Horses.

HEBER, AZ — March 16 is the deadline for public comment on the fate of the Heber Wild Horses. Comment link and talking points at the end of this post.

Why it is so important

Last week, the Forest Service released its proposed management plan for the Heber Wild Horse Territory.

It includes plans to limit the horses’ range to 21 square miles. The surrounding Apache-Sitgreaves National Forest covers more than 43 thousand square miles of public land.

Horse advocates say existing fencing prevents many of the horses from even accessing the designated territory. The Forest Service also intends to remove most of the horses from the area. They estimate there are currently between 292 and 471 horses.

The goal of the Forest Service is to limit the number of horses to 50 to 104. Critics say that would not allow for enough genetic diversity in the bands, or families, ultimately leading to the loss of all wild horses in that area.

Public comment highly significant

The forest service has been fighting to have the horses removed since 2005, but has been under a court order prohibiting that until a management plan was completed.

This action is therefore highly significant because it is the long-awaited result of the 2007 litigation initiated by horse advocates to halt a proposed round-up of horses on the Apache-Sitgreaves National Forests.

The legal action included a stipulation that the Forest Service “collaboratively engage the public to complete a territory management plan for the Heber Wild Horse Territory,” according to an earlier press release from the US Forest Service.

At the end of the 30 day comment period, the Forest Service will review the comments and “usher the proposed action forward collaboratively” with stakeholders.

Stakeholders include wild horse advocates, ranchers, wildlife managers, equine recreation professionals, equine training professionals, range science and veterinary medicine experts, Arizona Game and Fish Department and the Arizona Department of Agriculture.

Please take action right now, today, while you are thinking about it.

Leave your comments

Leave your comments online at the USFS website by March 16, 2020.

Talking points

Fund for Horses’ leadership and staff have collectively put together the following:

The Heber wild horses are a national treasure and should be protected and preserved. Removals will jeopardize the long term viability of the Heber herd. These horses are harming no one. Their native habits are naturally good for the environment and help maintain the land and cause it to flourish. People who live in the area testify that Heber wild horses herd numbers are being exaggerated by officials. Removal is totally unnecessary. I urge you to please do all you can to preserve this valuable herd of wild horses instead of placing them in jeopardy by unwarranted removals. In the meantime, Heber wild horses are being shot and killed. Please work with law enforcement and local citizens to catch the culprits as a matter of urgency. Thank you for taking my comments in serious consideration.

Tempting as it may be to copy and paste the above, please write something up in your own words and submit it here. Include facts but also speak from the heart.

March 16 is just round the corner. Could you please take action this weekend? Thank you for speaking up for these precious wild ones.

If you still feel you would like some more input, please visit the Heber Wild Horses Facebook page.


Fund for Horses Logo

Quote of the Day

Horse meat tartare in Jeju Island, Korea, restaurant.

[Horse flesh] is about as healthful as food contaminated with DDT.

—Nicholas Dodman, professor at Tufts University School of Veterinary Medicine

If you are looking for more talking points why U.S. legislators should enact H.R.961 and S.2006 (the “SAFE Act”), outlawing horse slaughter on U.S. soil and outside the U.S., this is an excellent one.

This directly supports the arguments made about toxic horse meat and why we should ban it.

Take action against horse slaughter today »