Deaths of rescued slaughter bound horses a painful reminder not much has changed

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HORSE SLAUGHTER (by Vivian Grant Farrell) — 2017 has been a tough year for many reasons. The toughest for me personally has been the deaths of two beloved horses.

Fourteen years ago, when Texans for Horses became the Fund for Horses I rescued four slaughter bound Quarter horses from a Texas feedlot. They had no papers. No one could or would tell us where they were from or how they had gotten in this hellish place.

Many of the horses in the feedlot had given up. They would not eat or drink, just crowded together for comfort staring vacantly ahead.

There were some however who still showed signs of hope crammed around the fence with terrified eyes beseeching someone anyone to help them. I picked four. It was all I could afford to transport home and care for. I named them after Texas cities — Houston, Austin, Amarillo and Sweetwater.

Turning my back on the others and walking away from them knowing the horrific sufferings and deaths they were about to face haunts me to this day. And for what? So human beings can dine on their dead flesh.

I can feel the awful pain and anguish of that moment just as keenly now as I did that day, and I still hate that I did not find a way to help every pleading one of them.

Two of the four horses I rescued, the mares Houston and Sweetwater, passed away a few years ago. Austin died in February of this year and Amarillo died last month in November. Both geldings, they had made friends in that grisly pasture 14 years ago, ending up spending the rest of their lives together.

Their deaths seem to signal an end for me but of what I am not certain. At first I thought that it might be hope. Very little to nothing has changed. Slaughter continues to thrive on the horses it brutally preys on.

I wish I could say with the passing of those horses that I rescued that day and escaped slaughter, that slaughter had finally been outlawed and no longer threatened any horse.

God knows we have worked as smartly and diligently as we know how to ban horse slaughter as have many, many others. However, it still exists to satisfy the human appetite for horse flesh, and making the people who supply it for them very wealthy.

My Christmas wish this year is that you will do any or all of the following to bring an end to horse slaughter in honour of horses past, present and future.

Continue to work or take up the cause to bring an end to horse slaughter. It does not matter how or where or what. Please take every action you know and hear to bring it to an end.

Support those who rescue horses from slaughter. Adopt a rescued horse yourself or sponsor one. Pledge or make a monthly donation, any amount. Find your local horse rescue and ask them what is on their Wish List — many have one — and gift them something on their list, either individually or with family and friends. Deliver it to the rescue and meet and greet the horses you are benefiting. It will make you feel like a million dollars. I promise.

Make a pledge in your heart right now that this time next year horses will no longer be slaughtered where you live and take action inn support of that pledge every opportunity you get.

We can do this. You can be sure that Houston, Austin, Amarillo and Sweetwater, and all horses like them, will be cheering you on.

Featured Image: AdobeStock_128452626.jpeg. Not for profit use.

Sign Petition telling Texas A&M to stop abusing and sending horses to slaughter

COMMERCE, TX — Horses are being exploited and abused at Texas A&M University including at Texas A&M University-Commerce (TAMUC) reports One Green Planet.

Justice for Tina

According to a petition on Care2 written by People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals (PETA), a horse by the name of Tina was brutally shot to death after being impregnated when she was suffering from a severe case of painful laminitis. Her foal was removed from her body and used for “educational” purposes at the school. (See Image. WARNING-GRAPHIC).

Reports showed that Tina’s laminitis had been neglected for so long that the pedal bones in her feet had “rotated through the soles of her feet,” causing “debilitating pain.”

It was also established Tina was not healthy enough to be impregnated.

This egregious cruelty was exposed by a whistleblower. Read more and sign Petition »

Horse Slaughter

Additionally, TAMUC has been known to sell horses online and send them to animal auctions, where their destiny is an almost-certain trip to Canada or Mexico to be slaughtered.

Sign the Petition

If you love horses and are saddened by TAMUC’s treatment of them, please take a moment to sign this petition addressed to the university asking them two things: to instate a zero-tolerance policy for neglect and abuse of their horses, and to stop selling horses online and at auctions, where they are almost always purchased to be slaughtered.

Social Media

Shame them publicly on Twitter. Tweet them using @TAMUC. Example: I just signed the Petition at https://goo.gl/k2zx1l re horrible horse cruelty @TAMUC. It will also raise awareness.

See also their Facebook page at https://www.facebook.com/tamuc/.

Texas A&M and Horses

The Department of Animal Science Horse Center at Texas A&M University supports the teaching, research and extension efforts of the faculty and students within the Department of Animal Science. The Horse Center breeds and sells horses throughout Texas, giving students a hands-on approach to the horse industry from breeding to management to marketing.

Texas A&M University–Commerce is a public research university located in Commerce, Texas. With an enrollment of over 12,000 students as of fall 2016, the university is the third largest institution in the Texas A&M University System.

Source: Texas A&M University’s website.

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Headshot of a horse at Texas A&M. From their website.

LAST UPDATE
5/10/17, 3:07 am

Emergency responders rescue nearly 100 horses trapped in high water near a Houston-area stable

Cross-posted from KHOU-TV

HOUSTON – Emergency responders helped to rescue nearly 100 horses trapped in high water near a Houston-area stable where flooding nearly reached the roofs of some buildings.

People driving by on a road near the flooding around Cypress Trails Equestrian Center on Cypresswood Drive stopped to yell encouragement to animals struggling to keep their heads above water Monday.

The horses were seen trying to get over what appeared to be a flood-inundated fence in the area near Cypress Creek.

Harris County officials called the Texas Animal Health Commission to get a rescue team to the stables just north of George Bush Intercontinental Airport. A number of roads near the airport were flooded Monday.

Around 2 p.m. Harris County Judge Ed Emmett posted this updated to his Facebook page:

    For those of you that may have seen the news reports of horses trapped in the water at Cypress Trails Equestrian Center, all but a few of the horses have been rescued or have been seen on higher ground. 3 or 4 are still loose but don’t appear to be in grave danger.

Witnesses say there are still residents swimming and wading through high water in the area to help the remaining horses.

Read more, view footage »


Featured Image Source: NewsUnited.com

Inside Conroe, Texas horse “nightmare” after massive seizure

The Houston SPCA is working to rehabilitate more than 200 horses after their owners were arrested on livestock cruelty charges. KTRK image.
The Houston SPCA is working to rehabilitate more than 200 horses after their owners were arrested on livestock cruelty charges. KTRK image.

We have been warning authorities for years about these animal hoarders, particularly in respect of the horses. At long last these horses are being freed. Texas is not typically recognized for its concerns regarding the ill treatment of livestock being a cattle state, so you can imagine how horrific the conditions of these horses were for them to sit up, take notice, and take action. We are so grateful to them and the Houston ASPCA.

ABC EYEWITNESS NEWS, KTRK, CHANNEL 13, HOUSTON REPORT

CONROE, TEXAS — Husband-and-wife farm owners Herman and Kathleen Hoffman are each charged with three counts of animal cruelty. They were arrested late last night and bonded out jail today. However, even though they bonded out of jail, they are not permitted back on the property. Officers will be at the farm around-the-clock to make sure they don’t try to take any of the horses or tamper with evidence.

Houston SPCA on the scene today removed horses in the worst condition and fed the rest mounds of hay. The horses Eyewitness News saw fed for hours.

Houston SPCA says they hope this will be the start of a new life for these animals.

Horses are starved to death in some cases. Flies swarmed around some of the animals’ open wounds. President of the Houston SPCA Patricia Mercer told Eyewitness News, “When you get to a point when you don’t have any muscle mass left, it’s really hard to stand.”

“We have over 200 horses and we are going to be doing blood work, diagnostics on these horses, farrier work,” Mercer continued. “Horses should have their feet trimmed every six weeks. Many of these horses it’s likely that they’ve never had their feet trimmed. They’re in very bad condition.”

Montgomery County Attorney JD Lambright said, “There is evidence of bones on the acreage out here, but just from that alone, that really don’t tell you anything, so that investigation will be ongoing.”

Lambright said earlier in the day, “The logistics – just, you can imagine the nightmare involved of getting this many horses in this condition off the premises and getting them some place for care…(they) will be taken to a medical care at the (Houston SPCA) facility.”

Mercer also told Eyewitness News her team is collecting evidence for the county attorney’s office and the district attorney’s office in anticipation of a custody hearing on Tuesday.

“We have a huge job ahead of us,” she continued. “It’s unusual to do a seizure on site, but because of the sheer number of horses involved, we’ve elected to take the most critical horses back to the Houston SPCA — all of these horses need care, all of these horses are in need of veterinary care and so we’ll be providing care on site here…but we’ll be taking about two dozen of them.”

Asked what she’s seeing at the farm, Mercer said, “(The horses are) in varying stages of neglect. Horses are very expensive to care for. We see a lot of hoof issues with these animals. Certainly some emaciation, poor nutrition issues and it’s really hard to pinpoint at this point. We’re doing cursory examinations….We have horses with a lot of health issues.”

Mercer added, “We’re hoping today is the day life changes for them.”

Mercer said she hopes Houston will step up to help with the care of these animals.

To help the Houston SPCA, go to their website.

View report »