Fun Horse Facts for Kids

Polk Reading with Rescues Program at at Hope Equine Rescue in Winter Haven, Florida.

Hey, it’s Patsy, back in the saddle here at Tuesday’s Horse.

School is in full swing. How about some horse facts for kids first?

Horse Facts for Kids

• Horses can sleep both lying down and standing up.

• Horses can run shortly after birth.

• Domestic horses have a lifespan of around 25 years.

• A 19th century horse named ‘Old Billy’ is said to have lived 62 years.

• Horses have around 205 bones in their skeleton.

• Horses have been domesticated for over 5000 years.

• Horses are herbivores (plant eaters).

• Horses have bigger eyes than any other mammal that lives on land.

• Because horse’s eyes are on the side of their head they are capable of seeing nearly 360 degrees at one time.

• Horses gallop at around 44 kph (27 mph).

• The fastest recorded sprinting speed of a horse was 88 kph (55 mph).

• Estimates suggest that there are around 60 million horses in the world.

• Scientists believe that horses have evolved over the past 50 million years from much smaller creatures.

• A male horse is called a stallion.

• A female horse is called a mare.

• A young male horse is called a colt.

• A young female horse is called a filly.

• Ponies are small horses.

Source: http://www.sciencekids.co.nz/sciencefacts/animals/horse.html. More about ponies at http://www.sciencekids.co.nz/sciencefacts/animals/pony.html.

Did you know . . . ?

All Thoroughbred racehorses no matter when they foal share the same birthday, January 1st, in the Northern Hemisphere, and August 1st, in the Southern Hemisphere. In the first year of their lives they are referred to as yearlings.

Here is a cool video for children of all ages. I learned some things I’d never heard, and I’ve around horses since I was a wee lassie. Turn the sound down before you hit play. It can be kinda loud.

Next up . . . .

Reading with Rescues

The featured image I chose for this post is from the Polk Reading with Rescues Program at Hope Equine Rescue in Winter Haven, Florida. I wanted so much to tell you about them.

The Hope Equine Rescue is where neglected, abused and simply unwanted horses, ponies, miniature horses and even donkeys are taken into care and rehabilitated, The Ledger of Lakeland, Florida tell us, plus something very special they do there, called Reading with Rescues:

Mary Shields is a saddle fitter by trade, working with show horses and riders, but runs the center’s Reading with Rescues program.

“It teaches the kids multiple things,” Shields said, the sun starting to dip low on the horizon and painting the barns in a golden light. “They learn how to speak in front of a crowd because horses don’t judge if they misspeak or mispronounce a word — they don’t laugh. Moms and dads will come and read with them. It fosters a love of reading for the kids.”

Shields said that last year, one boy had to read the entire U.S. Constitution, so he brought out a copy and read it to one of the rescues.

“Our horses are very educated,” she laughed.

From the Reading with Rescues Program at Hope Equine Rescue in Winter Haven, Florida.

Source: https://www.theledger.com/news/20190915/polk-reading-with-rescues-program-allows-kids-to-interact-with-horses »

Isn’t that the coolest? Be back with you soon. Thank you for stopping by and reading my post. — Patsy

Speed Miller shares the peace he’s found in horses with Detroit’s children

METRO TIMES (Detroit, Oct 3, 2018) — Excerpts from original article by Michael Jackman below. Read full article at the Metro Times here »

Speed Miller and his 21 year old Tennessee Walking Horse, Frisk. NOAH ELLIOT MORRISON.
Speed Miller and his 21 year old Tennessee Walking Horse, Frisk. NOAH ELLIOT MORRISON.

FOR YEARS NOW, alert motorists on Detroit’s west side have been treated to an unusual sight. They have posted photos of what they’ve seen on social networking and even sent them to our office, in surprise and in puzzlement, but mostly in delight. What they have witnessed is a young rider on a Western saddle guiding his horse down West Seven Mile Road, past the gas stations and fast food restaurants, a sight that seems so out of place in the car-centric Motor City as to be remarkable.

Late this summer, the horseman finally calls and invites us to watch him ride. On a recent morning, we drive over to a house near the intersection of West Seven Mile Road and the Lodge Freeway. There we finally connect with 21-year-old Speed Miller, the “Greenfield Gaucho” we’d seen photographed so widely. He speaks with us while he carefully guides his 12-year-old Tennessee walking horse named Frisk out of a stock trailer, carefully grooming the animal, which eyes us contentedly.

Miller credits his love of horses to his grandfather, the elderly man who watches from the porch for a moment before allowing his grandson to handle the reporter and photographer. The elder has owned a 44-acre farm outside of Belleville for generations, and that’s where the young rider began his love affair with horses. That fascination began with his mother, who found encouragement from Miller’s grandfather when she climbed into the saddle decades ago.

“I was there all the time,” Miller says. “I was raised by my mom, but I spent every day with my grandad. My mom was always at work, so I’d be chilling with my grandad. I guess you could say that I was raised by both in a sense. I think me and my grandad are a little bit closer though, ’cause I spent most of my days with him. He taught me pretty much everything I know about these horses.”

[ ] when Miller began riding in the city and saw how young Detroiters connected with the animals, he realized he could offer them the same joy he found in horses.

“The kids were actually fascinated,” he says, “so I started bringing them out more, letting the kids touch them. Then, as I got more comfortable with the horse, I started putting the kids on the horse, just showing them a little something different. So I bring them down about twice a week. It’s kind of like a learning experience for both the children and the horse, in my eyes.”

Speed Miller and friend riding around the neighborhood. NOAH ELLIOTT MORRISON.
Speed Miller and friend riding around the neighborhood. NOAH ELLIOTT MORRISON.

‘When I get on the horse, everything else really don’t matter. I can ride down these streets in the toughest neighborhood. It really just don’t matter when I’m on the horse.’

Read more of this story at Detroit’s Metro Times »

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This puts us in mind of the Sir Winston Churchill quote:

 ‘There is something about the outside of a horse that is good for the inside of a man.’

Airman learns resilience and helps other with horses

Airman 1st Class Lauren Nolan, 22nd Logistics Readiness Squadron materials management journeyman, poses for a photo with her horses, Tiz and Shoobie, Oct. 13, 2016, in Wichita, Kan. When Nolan moved to McConnell Air Force Base, Kan. her first duty station she had her horses shipped to the area and now boards them off-base in the local community. (U.S. Air Force photo/ Airman 1st Class Jenna K. Caldwell)

Cross-posted from US Department of Defense
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MCCONNELL AIR FORCE BASE, Kan., Oct. 31, 2016 — Air Force Airman 1st Class Lauren Nolan remembers running around the woods of North Carolina trying to catch a wild horse while she was growing up in North Carolina. She had fallen in love with a flea-bitten, little and gray Arabian horse that nobody could manage to catch, except her.

Not yet tall enough to put the halter on, she said, she would put the rope around the horse’s neck and look to her dad for help.

For Nolan, a 22nd Logistics Readiness Squadron materials management journeyman, this is where her passion for horses began, and that passion continues to be a blessing in her Air Force career.

Stationed here since 2015, Lauren has two horses that occupy her time: Tiz Sunshine, 4 years old, and Shoobie, 6 years old, both off-the-track thoroughbreds. She boards them in the local community and spends her off-duty time taking care of them and training them for barrel racing.

With the unique challenges military members face, from frequent moves to deployments, everybody needs a way to unwind. Spending time with the horses is Nolan’s way, and realizing how much Tiz and Shoobie help her, she is sharing this experience with others.

“Every once in a while, I’ll take airmen out to see them so they can have their little getaway,” she said. “They could come ride them, brush them or just interact with the horses to help them cope with whatever they’re dealing with.”

Nolan also brings airmen’s families out to see the horses. She specifically wants to help first-term airmen who are new to base, as well as children with deployed parents, she said.

“I take anybody out to see the horses who needs it,” she added.

Read full story »

FEATURED IMAGE
Airman 1st Class Lauren Nolan, 22nd Logistics Readiness Squadron materials management journeyman, poses for a photo with her horses, Tiz and Shoobie, Oct. 13, 2016, in Wichita, Kan. When Nolan moved to McConnell Air Force Base, Kan. her first duty station she had her horses shipped to the area and now boards them off-base in the local community. (U.S. Air Force photo/ Airman 1st Class Jenna K. Caldwell)