4th horse killed at Del Mar

Blinkered racehorse closeup. Photographer not specified.

Fox News reports:

DEL MAR, Calif. — A 3-year-old racehorse was euthanized after a training injury in Del Mar, the Del Mar Thoroughbred Club confirmed Monday.

The 3-year-old filly, Bri Bri, suffered a serious pelvis injury, officials said. They did not immediately clarify when the injury occurred.

“Del Mar has implemented a series of safety and welfare reforms over the last several racing seasons, including the creation of an independent five-member panel to review all entries,” the club said in a statement.

Which means what exactly, we ask.

She was the 4th horse killed in during Del Mar’s summer season.

On July 29, a three-year old filly broke down during training after a leg injury. Two horses were killed July 18 in a freak accident when a two-year old threw his rider and collided head-on with a three-year old, also during a morning workout.

Horse racing kills in Australia

Jockey tries to hold an Australian steady up who has a badly fractured foreleg.

From the Australian “Death Watch” report at the Horse Racing Kills website:

Caslon Quote Left BlackFor a one year period from 1 August 2017 to 31 July 2018, the Coalition for the Protection of Racehorses has collected data from the stewards reports from every state and territory in Australia, compiling a detailed report of the horses who have died in racing and the reasons why – something that is not made available to the public each year by the industry itself.”

The 12 month period of data collection ends on the Horse’s Birthday (August 1) and is released on the first day of Spring (September 1). This is also known as the racing year in Australia.

Their report shows that the total kills for the one year period was 119, or one dead racehorse every three days. 46 of the 119 were 2 yr olds.

It is our view that 2 year olds should not be raced, with good reason. Read on.

by JANE ALLIN

Racing Babies: Are Two-Year Olds Too Young?

Part 1:  Introduction
Part 2:  Stages of Bone Growth in the Horse
Part 3:  Effects of Training and Racing on the Immature Musculoskeletal System
Part 4:  What Racing People Say: Fact or Fiction?
Part 5:  The Verdict: Training Regiments – Too Much, Too Soon?

In the Introduction Allin writes:

Caslon Quote Left BlackMore than a sport, horse racing is a huge business where moneyed gentry spend their fortunes during yearling sales with the expectation that these horses begin to earn their keep at the tender age of two. It is indeed an unyielding situation in which horses are valued largely for the first three years of their life and wherein their bona fide value is ultimately established.

“Above all the investor’s main objective is to race 2-year olds in preparation for the celebrated 3-year old stakes races after which these adolescent horses will be retired to the breeding shed. It is well recognized that the modern Thoroughbred’s peak earning potential occurs at the age of three with, on average, diminishing return at the age of four and beyond.”

“The current owners want two-year-old racing and I think it’s a pity. I think it’s a pity because it certainly does cause the breakdown of a lot of two year olds.” — Percy Sykes, horse racing industry vet.

An Australian study on the rates of injuries that occur during the training and racing of 2-year olds revealed that 85% suffered at least one incident of injury or disease. See “Racing Babies”, Part 3 by Jane Allin.

• See all our Special Reports, especially those by Jane Allin, on The Horse Fund website »

Thoroughbred Industry Organizations’ Statements On Current Crisis

Horses jump out the gate at Del Mar racetrack in California. Unattributed Google search result.

The Ray Paulick Report post entitled, “Thoroughbred Industry Organizations’ Statements On Current Crisis“, was published yesterday evening.

Mr. Paulick put it to horse racing stakeholders this way:

Paulick email: In recent weeks, I’ve been approached and contacted by numerous people whose livelihoods depend on the Thoroughbred industry, telling me they fear for the industry’s future, and asking me, “What is (fill in the name of the organization) doing to protect the racing industry?”

I throw that question to all of you individually, as leaders of national organizations: What is your organization doing in response to the crisis now facing this industry, one that demands that the industry and those in positions of authority do absolutely everything humanly possible to protect the health and welfare of horses? 

First of all, it’s too late to “do absolutely everything humanly possible to protect the health and welfare of horses”. The integrity of the American Thoroughbred racehorse has been totally compromised through generations of chemical interference and doping from the moment these horses are foaled. They cannot go back now and do a do-over. They are stuck with what they got.

Plus the other elephant in the room  — horse racing is addicted to doping. They are never, ever going to give it up. They don’t know how to train without doping.

Perhaps it would be fairer to say that constant doping is the only way at this point to keep horse racing going. It’s highly likely and probable that it’s impossible now to get a racehorse on the track to train or race without administering a long laundry list of drugs, probably daily.

If you decide to read their responses you will see how panicked they are, which in turn means you won’t be able to believe a damn thing they say. We weren’t going to anyway.

Slow curtain. The end.

Hollendorfer wins his lawsuit to return to racing

Jerry Hollendorfer racehorse trainer, killer and doper. Racing Post image.

Sometimes there seems little justice in life, but was trainer Jerry Hollendorfer made the poster boy for the rash of racecourse deaths in the killing fields of California racing? He was asked to take his horses and move out of Santa Anita following the reported 30 deaths that caught national headlines, and some of which he was responsible for.

In the hot glare of the negative publicity swirling around those racehorse killings, horse racing desperately needed to look like they were doing something, and banishing Hollendorfer seemed like that something.

Hollendorfer tried other racetracks who said, yes, okay, we’ll let you in, only to change their minds. When he applied at Del Mar and they said no dice, he sued them.

ESPN reports:

Hall of Fame jockey Jerry Hollendorfer is now allowed to train and race horses at Del Mar following a ruling Friday in a San Diego courtroom.

Hollendorfer had sued Del Mar earlier this month after the Southern California racetrack refused to allow him to enter races during the track’s meet or keep his horses in the track’s stalls. He sought an injunction to allow him to race at the track, and San Diego County Superior Court Judge Ronald Frazier granted that request.

The suit was filed after the track declined to give him stalls due to “[public-relations] risks and considerations,” according to court filings. Hollendorfer had previously been banned at Santa Anita and Golden Gate Park, two tracks owned by The Stronach Group, after four of his horses died during the Santa Anita meet, completed last month, where 30 horses were euthanized.

The response to the lawsuit by Del Mar attorneys alleges that during the meeting June 28 where they told Hollendorfer he wouldn’t be allowed to participate, his attorney said, “We get it. Jerry’s radioactive. We get it.”

Horse racing is radioactive. A toxic killer of horses.

And we strongly object to the use of the more pleasant sounding term “euthanized” when these racehorses catastrophically and painfully broke down and had to be killed to put them out of their misery. Insured too, no doubt.

In the meantime, “according to Equibase, Hollendorfer horses have won 7,623 races in his training career and have collected purses of $199,932,748,” reports the same ESPN article.

Who writes this stuff? The horses have collected purses of . . . ? Yes, we know what they mean. Still.

Blood money.


IMAGE
Racing Post image. Not filed with ESPN story.

See also “The Slow and Merciless Death of American Horse Racing“, Tuesday’s Horse, May 28, 2019