Nevada BLM set to discuss use of motorized vehicles to manage wild horses

Wild horse helicopter roundup. National Geographic.

UPDATE: PUBLIC COMMENT DEADLINE EXTENDED BY THE BLM TO JULY 2ND. PLEASE MAIL YOUR COMMENTS AS QUICKLY AS YOU CAN.

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KIBS | KBOV TV, BATTLE MOUNTAIN, NV. (22. Jun. 2020) — The Bureau of Land Management (BLM) Nevada will host its annual statewide public hearing to discuss the use of helicopters and motorized vehicles and aircraft in the monitoring and management of wild horses and burros on public lands in Nevada.

The hearing is scheduled for Thursday, June 25, 2020, from 5 to 6 p.m. at the Lander County Courthouse located at 50 NV-305, Battle Mountain, NV 89820. For the health and safety of participants, wearing of masks during the public meeting will be mandatory and all other CDC and Nevada health guidelines will be followed.

The purpose of the hearing, required by the Federal Land Policy and Management Act, is to solicit public comment on the use of helicopters and fixed wing aircraft to estimate wild horse or burro population size and the use of helicopters to gather and remove excess animals. The hearing will also consider the use of motorized vehicles to transport gathered wild horse or burros, as well as, to conduct field monitoring activates.

Nevada’s statewide wild horse and burro population numbers currently exceed 51,500 animals, which is more than 400 percent of the approved appropriate management level of 12,811. Having an overabundance of wild horses and burros above BLM management levels may cause resource damage resulting in limited forage and water availability, which reduces the number of animals that the land can support.

“Helicopter and motorized vehicle usage is a critical tool for managing wild horses and burros on public lands,” said Ruth Thompson, BLM Nevada’s Wild Horse and Burro State Lead. “These management tools allow us to conduct aerial population surveys, monitor animal distribution, conduct safe and effective gathers, and transport captured animals in a humane and efficient manner.”

Since legislated removals began in 1976, the BLM Nevada has removed more than 161,196 wild horses and burros from Nevada’s rangelands. Over 5,477 of those animals have been adopted or sold locally; the majority of animals gathered in Nevada shipped to other states for adoption, sale or older animals are sent to off-range pastures to live out the remainder of their lives.

If you cannot attend the hearing, written comments must be mailed to the BLM Battle Mountain District Office, attention: Jess Harvey, 50 Bastian Rd, Battle Mountain, NV 89820 and must be received by close of business on June 25, 2020, to be considered.


EDITOR’S NOTE. Here is the BLM Battle Mountain Office contact information. Feel free to email them before the deadline. They close at 4:30 pm Pacific time. Comments must be in writing.

Please do this right now while you are thinking about it. Thank you!

Mailing Address:
50 Bastian Road, Battle Mountain, NV 89820

Email:
BLM_NV_BMDOwebmail@blm.gov

Phone: 775-635-4000
Fax: 775-635-4034
TTY/Federal Relay System:
1-800-877-8339

Want to fax and don’t have a fax machine? Try eFax. They are conducting a free trial.


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Thirteen California wild horses are captured and released in Colorado

Wild horses wander in the Sand Wash herd management area 45 miles west of Craig, Colo., in the Sand Wash Basin. Joe Amon, The Denver Post.

OUTTHERECOLORADO.COM (22 Jun. 2020) — Thirteen wild horses removed from an overpopulated range in California were released back into the wild in Northern Colorado over the weekend.

According to a report from CBS Denver, the thirteen wild horses taken from Modoc National Forest are now settling into their new 60-acre home near Red Feather Lakes. The horses are the first of 19 total to be released on the range in Colorado.

The non-profit organization Love Wild Horses says the “wild ponies” also play a big role in reducing the risk of wildfires by consuming fuel loads such as underbrush and other vegetation through natural grazing patterns.

If you want to see wild horses, here are four spots where you can still see them in Colorado.


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FEATURED IMAGE: Wild horses wander in the Sand Wash herd management area 45 miles west of Craig, Colo., in the Sand Wash Basin. Joe Amon, The Denver Post.

Wild Mustangs reunite at Skydog Sanctuary

Wild Horses. Skydog Sanctuary video.

We are yearning to see something beautiful, moving and inspirational. How about you? Horses offer that, and much, much more. Sit back and relax for a few minutes and watch this.

Watch

DESCRIPTION: Wild horses Goliath and Red Lady reunite after being separated by a BLM roundup. After being apart for six months they see each other for the first time at Skydog Sanctuary and shortly afterwards have a final foal together.

Follow Skydog Sanctuary on Facebook »


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BLM capture of iconic Wild Horse herd sparks controversy

Senator Landrieu, Congressman Grijalva Join Public in Calling for an Immediate End to the Mismanagement of the West’s Living Legends

Source: Press Release by The Cloud Foundation

LOVELL, WY– September 17, 2009 — Once wild and free, living in spectacular sub-alpine meadows designated by Congress as their home, 57 wild Mustangs now wait in dusty pens in the 90 degree heat. The BLM pens sit at the base of the Pryor Mountain Wild Horse Range of Wyoming and Montana. The corrals offer no shade for the wild horses, now branded, with ropes and numbers around their necks. 19 year-old Conquistador is no longer a proud band stallion. He is number 5336. 21 year-old Grumpy Grulla is no longer a lead mare. She is number 5321.

Conquistador is no longer a proud band stallion.  He is number 5336, taken from our public lands, and held prisoner in a BLM pen at the base of the Pryor Mountain Range where he was born, and lived wild and free for 19 years.
Conquistador is no longer a proud band stallion. He is number 5336, taken from our public lands, and held prisoner in a BLM pen at the base of the Pryor Mountain Range where he was born, and lived wild and free for 19 years.

The Pryor Mountain wild horses have been made world famous by the popular PBS Nature series that has followed the pale Palomino Stallion “Cloud,” throughout his lifetime. The third program will air this Fall in October, but many of the horses the world will meet next month are among those being put up for sale and adoption at the Britton Springs corrals in Lovell, WY on Sept. 26th. “They are losing what they value most – their freedom and their families,” says Ginger Kathrens, Volunteer Executive Director of the Cloud Foundation.

“Despite a National outcry and letters from Congress demanding that the BLM halt these roundups until an acceptable long-term plan is made, we have yet to see them make a single concession to an outraged public. Somewhere along the line BLM forgot that these are the public’s horses on the public’s land.” Kathrens continues.

Great hopes for change lie in the Restore Our American Mustang Act (ROAM- §1579), now in the Senate Energy and Natural Resources Committee. Advocates are planning a gathering, “Mustangs on the Hill,” in Washington D.C. on September 29th. Supporters of preserving our wild herds will fan out and meet with key Senate staffers and Senators. “The ROAM Act comes too late for thousands of horses, but we are hopeful that Congress can ride to the rescue for our wild horses,” states Arizona advocate, Julianne French. The Wild Horse and Burro Act of 1971 saved wild horses in the American West from complete destruction. Since then, the BLM, charged with their protection, has failed to follow the Act. Nearly 20 million acres have been taken away from the dedicated land set aside for America’s wild horses. Over 30,000 wild horses are held by the BLM at a cost of over $100,000 per day according to Ed Roberson, Department of Interior official. Advocates are demanding that the wild horses be returned to the rangelands that were stolen from them. Congressman Grijalva (D-AZ) called for a stop to all roundups and Senator Landrieu (D-LA) recently called for the management of wild horses to be taken away from the BLM altogether.

The American public is enamored with the mustang, one of the last symbols of freedom and the disappearing spirit of the American West. “Isn’t it time that the public finds out the truth, that this gross misconduct is not a result of managing for ‘healthy horses on healthy rangelands, but is an all out eradication of America’s wild horses?” questions advocate Monika Courtney. “Will hoof beats be replaced completely by oil and gas rigs and uranium mines as the old-guard BLM regime carries forth? BLM is betraying not only our horses, but our nation.” As one advocate stated, “The West will one day be about as wild as Wal-Mart.”

The small Spanish mustangs in the Pryor herd, descendents of the Lewis and Clark expedition horses and the original Crow war ponies, may not be aware that their highly contested roundup and subsequent removal has created a wave a protest from Thoroughbred racing forums to front porches in South Texas. “A whole new group of advocates concerned about our wild horses have come out against this roundup,” states Willis Lamm, a horse trainer noted for his work with BLM mustangs. “Moving forward with this roundup was a huge mistake on the part of the BLM.”

For more information contact:
The Cloud Foundation
Valerie Kennedy, Public Relations Manager 312-371-4933
Makendra Silverman, Associate Director 719-351-8187
info@thecloudfoundation.org