Susan Peirce and Baldwin a rescue horse. (Jennifer Cappuccio Maher/Staff Photographer)

Red Bucket: Rescuing horses takes hard work and tears

Susan Peirce and Baldwin a rescue horse.  (Jennifer Cappuccio Maher/Staff Photographer)
Founder Susan Peirce of Red Bucket Equine Ranch hugs “Baldwin,” who, before being rescued, was going to be fed to mountain lions. (Jennifer Cappuccio Maher/Staff Photographer).

Canan Tasci reporting for the Contra Costa Times writes:

The founder of Red Bucket Equine Ranch and its 400 volunteers are on a mission to save and rehabilitate horses who have been abused, neglected or malnourished.

To date, Red Bucket has rescued 109 horses and found permanent homes for 48.

“We’ve taken horses that are shattered; they don’t even expect to be fed, let alone us being kind to them,” said Peirce, who has rescued horses from breeding scandals, euthanasia or even being fed to mountain lions.

One of the rescued horses had been found by animal-control officers standing in a pool of her own blood after being used to bait pit bulls

We have all heard the horror stories of dogs and cats, even miniature ponies, used to bait and torn apart by pit bulls. However, never a grown horse. All monstrous. But this is what those who are on the front lines of animal rescue deal with.

What is significant about the Red Bucket Equine Ranch story is the attitude of the people who founded, Susan Peirce and her husband David, and Mary Behrens. Based in Chino Hills, California, they run it as a business, an approach which does not exclude what all authentic rescues have, plenty of heart.

The article states:

“We believe in the intimacy of the horse. When a horse comes to us, they have nothing of their own, so when they come here they get a red bucket and they get a name,” Peirce said.

Once the horse gets a bucket with [his or her] name on it, [he or she] also gets a goal and a training plan to prepare [him or her] for adoption.

The bucket she refers to is red of course, hence the name Red Bucket Equine Ranch.

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