The Case of the Queen and the Flatulent Horse

HM The Queen is not amused. Reader's Digest image.

Hello there. We have so much doom and gloom on these pages, we thought perhaps it was time to throw in a bit of humour — at HM The Queen’s expense.

The Mirror newspaper reports:

The Queen is probably one of the last people on earth you can imagine breaking wind in public. Not only would it be mortifying to accidentally let it escape while meeting her subjects, but the whole world would soon get to know about it. Sometimes, it’s really not better out than in.

On I’m A Celebrity…Get Me Out Of Here Australia, former royal butler Paul Burrell shared a story about a case of embarrassing flatulence which happened on a carriage ride.

According to Burrell, The Queen, Prince Philip and the Sultan of Bahrain were all in the same carriage. Setting the scene, he adds “Imagine the picture. I’m sat here, people are singing God Save The Queen, and the Queen and Prince Philip are next to me.”

“The Sultan of Bahrain had been enjoying polite small talk with his royal hosts when suddenly, a huge explosion of wind came from one of the horses in front. The party might have managed to gloss over it, except the smell was apparently horrendous and went straight through the carriage.

The intervening silence was almost as embarrassing as the odour hanging in the air.

“Do you think I should say something?” she asked Phillip who said, “Yes, do.”

So the Queen leaned forward and touched the Sultan’s knee and said, “I’m terribly sorry about that awful noise,” and sat back.

The Sultan leaned forward and said: “That’s quite alright, your majesty… I thought it was one of the horses!”

Well, yes.

Quote of the Day

“In the steady gaze of the horse shines a silent eloquence that speaks of love and loyalty, strength and courage. It is the window that reveals to us how willing is his spirit, how generous his heart.” ~ Author Unknown

Stop racehorses from being shipped to South Korea and slaughtered

Horses are shipped to Korea to be slaughtered.

by JUDY MOLLAND

Over the past six years, one third of the racehorses sent from Australia to South Korea has died, according to an analysis by Guardian Australia. One of those was the brother of the beloved racehorse Winx – Bareul Jeong was shipped to South Korea, then killed and likely eaten!

The Guardian adds: “A further 11% are listed in the Korean Racing Authority (KRA) records as “undecided,” an entry that often coincides with an abrupt end to their medical history, or the listing of an injury that is incompatible with racing.”

The problem is that these animals are exported to breed or race, and not for slaughter, so they are not covered by Australian laws that govern the live export industry. Once they arrive in South Korea, they are subject only to that country’s laws.

The cruelty that South Korea imposes on these horses has come to light thanks to footage filmed secretly at the one of the main horse abattoirs at Nonghyup on Jeju Island in South Korea.

It shows horses being trucked into a facility, hit hard with a poly pipe and then forced to enter a fenced-off channel where they are herded along with the pipes and enter the kill box to be stunned by a captive bolt device.

We must put an end to this.

Since South Korea has shown such despicably cruel treatment to these horses, Australia must stop exporting racehorses to South Korea.

Please sign my Petition

•  SIGN MY PETITION HERE »

People are signing this Petition from around the world. Please help. As of this writing, we only need 10,000 more signatures to meet our goal. Will you help?

Thank you!

 

California “Easy Fire” horses and emergency preparation tips

Stephanie Nagler, right, helps evacuate horses from the Sullivan Canyon Equestrian Community in Brentwood on Tuesday.(Mel Melcon / Los Angeles Times)

Not All Heroes Wear Capes

A touching video captures the moment a brave horse galloped back into a roadside area overcome by thick smoke — despite rescuers’ attempts to corral him — to bring two other horses to safety as the Easy Fire raged in Ventura County.

“From the #EasyFire in Simi Valley — this thoroughbred goes back into the blaze to get his family,” Rex Chapman posted to Twitter Thursday. “Not all heroes wear capes . . .”

Dorany Pineda of the The LA Times reported:

The Easy fire, which broke out shortly after 6 a.m. near Easy Street and Madera Road, has forced thousands of people from their homes as officials try to keep flames from overtaking neighborhoods.

Volunteers help evacuate horses during the Easy Fire, Wednesday, Oct. 30, 2019, in Simi Valley, Calif. (Christian Monterrosa/AP)
Volunteers help evacuate horses during the Easy Fire, Wednesday, Oct. 30, 2019, in Simi Valley, Calif. (Christian Monterrosa/AP)

The equestrian community has consistently come together during fires. Volunteers often find people who need help through word-of-mouth or on social media, especially through a Facebook group called Southern California Equine Emergency Evacuation.

Cheryl Kanan evacuates with her horse Aries as the Easy fire approaches Wednesday, Oct. 30, 2019, in Simi Valley, Calif. A new wildfire erupted Wednesday in wind-whipped Southern California, forcing the evacuation of the Ronald Reagan Presidential Library and nearby homes, as both ends of the state struggled with blazes, dangerously gusty weather and deliberate blackouts. (AP Photo/Marcio Jose Sanchez)
Cheryl Kanan evacuates with her horse Aries as the Easy fire approaches Wednesday, Oct. 30, 2019, in Simi Valley, Calif. A new wildfire erupted Wednesday in wind-whipped Southern California, forcing the evacuation of the Ronald Reagan Presidential Library and nearby homes, as both ends of the state struggled with blazes, dangerously gusty weather and deliberate blackouts. (AP Photo/Marcio Jose Sanchez)

Ms Pineda posted these superb tips to get and keep you prepared in case of an emergency regarding pets and large animals such as horses. Thank you Ms Pineda and the LA Times.

Preparing Pets for Emergencies

Before an emergency strikes:

  • Microchip your pets and make sure they have proper and up-to-date identification. If you’re separated from your animals, a microchip will increase your chances of reuniting with them.
  • Include phone numbers of out-of-area friends or family in your microchip registration. It’s a good idea to include alternate contacts in case you can’t be reached.Locate pet-friendly lodgings.
  • Contact hotels and motels in and outside of your city and ask if they accept pets during emergencies.
  • Do the same for boarding facilities. Know where they are and visit them.
  • Get your pet used to being in a kennel. It’ll make it easier to transport them.
  • Paste a rescue alert sticker visibly on one of your home’s windows with the number and species of animals in your household. (If you evacuate with your pets, write “Evacuated” on the sticker.)

Preparing Large Animals for Emergencies

  • Microchip the animal or wrap an identification bracelet around one of his feet.
  • Train your horse or other large animal to load into a trailer.
  • If possible, make prior arrangements for boarding at stables outside of your city.
  • Store important documents and paperwork in cloud storage or several hard drives. It’s a good idea to give one to a friend or family who lives outside of your community.

Make a Large Animal Evacuation Kit

Include the following:

FOOD

  • Drums or barrels of water, enough for at least three days.
  • A list of all medicines and their doses and if possible, an extra supply of medication. Make sure to check their expiration dates regularly.
  • Rope and leather halters. Don’t use nylon halters. They can melt from extreme heat and burn the animal.

IMPORTANT DOCUMENTS AND PAPERWORK

  • Copies of ownership records
  • Vaccination and health records
  • Microchip paperwork

IDENTIFICATION

  • Photos of brands
  • Photos of your large animal that show any distinctive marks or tattoos

It is never recommended that you leave your large animal behind or let him loose during an emergency. The Department of Animal Services offers assistance for large animal transportation.

If you have a horse and absolutely can’t evacuate with him and have to set him loose, the National Fire Protection Assn. suggests you make sure to mark or attach your contact information on him by:

  • Shaving it into his coat
  • Braiding an identification tag into his mane
    Attaching it onto a neck band
  • Writing it on his side with spray paint or a livestock marker

Be sure to have an evacuation kit ready.